Pate's Grammar School

  (Redirected from Cheltenham Grammar School)

Pate's Grammar School is a grammar school with academy status in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England. It caters for pupils aged 11 to 18 and is a Beacon school. The school was founded with a fund bestowed to Corpus Christi College, Oxford by Richard Pate in 1574. The school became co-educational in 1986, when Pate's Grammar School for Girls merged with Cheltenham Grammar School.

Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School crest.png
Address
Pate's Grammar School is located in Gloucestershire
Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School is located in England
Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School is located in the United Kingdom
Pate's Grammar School
Pate's Grammar School
Princess Elizabeth Way

, ,
GL51 0HG

England
Coordinates51°54′25″N 2°07′01″W / 51.907°N 2.117°W / 51.907; -2.117Coordinates: 51°54′25″N 2°07′01″W / 51.907°N 2.117°W / 51.907; -2.117
Information
TypeGrammar school;
Academy
MottoLatin: Patebit tum quod Latuit
English: That which is hidden shall be revealed
Established1574
FounderRichard Pate
Department for Education URN136353 Tables
OfstedReports
Head teacherRussel Ellicott
Staff87 teaching, 35 support
GenderCoeducational
Age11 to 18
Enrolment995
Houses     Beaufort
     Gloucester
     Richmond
     York
     Pembroke
Colour(s)Black, grey, white, red
                         
PublicationPate's Progress
The Grammar School Gazette
AlumniOld Patesians
Website

In November 2012 Pate's was awarded with State ‘Secondary School of the Year’ by The Sunday Times in their Good Schools Guide.[1] In 2013, the school was given an Outstanding judgement by Ofsted.

Academic achievementsEdit

At GCSE level in 2004, 100% of pupils entered earned five A* to C grades,[2] and the school came twelfth in the BBC table of performance in A-/AS-Level.[3] Again in 2005, 100% of pupils earned five A* to C grades at GCSE,[4] and in 2006, 100% of pupils passed in at least seven subjects with grades A* to C.[5] In 2008, more A* grades were achieved collectively than any other grade put together at GCSE level.

The physics department was recognised as the best in the country in a survey published by The Observer in May 2006.[6]

In 2012 The Sunday Times ranked Pate's as the fourth best state secondary school in the United Kingdom. It was also awarded with State ‘Secondary School of the Year’.[7]

Sporting achievementsEdit

The senior rugby team was coached by ex-England scrum-half Peter Kingston until his retirement in 2009.[citation needed] In 2007 Pate's senior rugby teams completed a season unbeaten for the first time in 21 years.[citation needed]

The Old Patesians club has grounds and a clubhouse in Leckhampton, which was built when their previous premises were demolished to make way for Cheltenham's tallest building, Eagle House.

CommunityEdit

The school has a school council; the team of pupils and sixth formers from across the school is intended to help the students enjoy their time at Pate's more beneficially and give them a voice in school affairs.

The school competes in the Young Enterprise competition held amongst schools nationwide. In 2007, it reached the national finals for the Make Your Mark Enterprise Challenge held in London.[citation needed] The school was also named as one of the four winners of the annual BBC School's Question Time competition in 2009.[8] During the 1970s the school were winners of the BBC radio show Top of the Form.

Pate's is also involved with charity work and has a Charity Committee appointed each year; in 2007–2008, over £16,000 was raised. The school is situated in a deprived area of Cheltenham and under the headmaster Richard Kemp deprived students were encouraged to apply.

The current headmaster is Russel Ellicott, who took over from Shaun Fenton in September 2012.[citation needed]

DevelopmentsEdit

The boys school was established in 1586. The Gothic premises in the High Street were demolished in 1967 to make way for a concrete supermarket, at a time when many other historic buildings, which would now be listed and protected, were also lost. The school playing field existed quite remote from the school in Hesters Way, and a replacement school was built there, after the boundaries had been altered to make way for the Princess Elizabeth Way and Coronation Square council developments. The majority of pupils lived in more affluent areas on the opposite side of the town and needed to commute by public transport. The building was designed by architects who had won awards for New Hall College Cambridge, but its appearance was not popular, it incorporated various impractical features, and developed structural problems. It was demolished in the 1990s and replaced by an adjacent new building. During this period the school somehow lost its nomanclature with Richard Pate, and his name instead became associated with the girl's school at Pittville

The school raised funds in order to complete new fitness facilities. The £50,000 fitness suite was officially opened by Geoff Hurst in April 2010.

In summer 2012, Pate's Grammar completed the construction of a new refectory, costing £1.75 million. This also involved upgrading the school canteen to a cashless catering system operated by sQuid. It was opened by the Duke of Gloucester on 5 October 2012. Plans have been announced for a new sixth form block to be built and completed summer 2019.[9]

In 2013, a new school block was opened named 'The George and Eve Tatam Block', after alumni who also sponsor higher level study at the Corpus Christi College of both Oxford and Cambridge.[citation needed]

In spring 2019, a new sixth form block opened following a grant received in 2017. The three-storey building comprises study spaces and IT facilities on the lower two floors, whilst the upper floor houses the senior library. The building links directly to the George and Eve Tatum Block next to which it is constructed.[citation needed]

Former headmasters and headmistressesEdit

Pate's Grammar SchoolEdit

  • 2012–Present: Russel Ellicott
  • 2006–2012: Shaun Fenton
  • 2000–2006: Richard Kemp
  • 1986–1999: David J. Barnes

Cheltenham Grammar SchoolEdit

  • 1983–1986: P.J. Bamford
  • 1971–1983: Bernard Wilkinson
  • 1952–1971: Dr Arthur E. Bell
  • 1937–1952: Geoffrey Heawood
  • 1918–1937: R.R. Dobson
  • 1882–1906: John Style
  • 1868–1882: Henry Martyn Jeffery, FRS
  • 1859–1868: Henry Hayman
  • 1852–1859: Dr Edward Rupert Humphreys

Pate's Grammar School for GirlsEdit

  • 1982–1986: J. Whiting (Acting Head)
  • 1971–1982: Mary M. Moon
  • 1970-1971: Jean O Huddlestone (Acting Head)
  • 1952–1970: Margaret E. Lambrick
  • 1946–1952: Dame Margaret Miles
  • 1934–1946: Muriel Jennings
  • 1911–1934: Anita N. Miles
  • 1905–1911: Helen Headley

Notable former pupilsEdit

Pate's Grammar SchoolEdit

Cheltenham Grammar SchoolEdit

Pate's Grammar School for GirlsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 24 December 2012. Retrieved 18 November 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Top GCSE results 2005 Archived 2005-09-13 at the Wayback Machine, BBC News Online, 13 January 2005
  3. ^ Top A-Level results 2005 Archived 2005-09-13 at the Wayback Machine, BBC News Online, 13 January 2005
  4. ^ School profile, BBC News Online, 19 January 2006
  5. ^ "Pate's Grammar School Cheltenham". www.Pates.Gloucs.sch.uk. Archived from the original on 2 January 2018. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  6. ^ Excellence of physics department recognised, The Observer, 21 May 2006
  7. ^ "The Times & The Sunday Times". TheTimes.co.uk. Retrieved 2 January 2018.
  8. ^ 2009 student producers announced Archived 2009-04-14 at the Wayback Machine, BBC, 2 April 2009
  9. ^ http://www.thisisgloucestershire.co.uk/Royalty-arrives-open-new-refectory/story-17044890-detail/story.html[dead link]
  10. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 14 April 2014. Retrieved 13 April 2014.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)'}
  11. ^ a b c Robson, David (25 September 2008). "Town vs Gown: Cheltenham, Gloucestershire". London: The Telegraph. Archived from the original on 9 July 2011. Retrieved 24 November 2012.

External linksEdit