Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York

Catholic Charities New York logo.jpg

Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York is one of the largest charitable organizations in the New York metropolitan area. It is a federation made up of 90 social service agencies throughout the 10 counties of the Archdiocese of New York - Bronx, Dutchess, New York, Orange, Putnam, Richmond, Rockland, Sullivan, Ulster and Westchester. It is part of a nationwide network of local human service organizations that form Catholic Charities USA—the fourth-largest social service provider in the United States, according to Forbes,[1] and the 10th largest fundraising organization in the United States, according to The Chronicle of Philanthropy.[2]

Contents

Service areasEdit

The charity delivers, coordinates and advocates for human services and programs dedicated to alleviating poverty, serving people of all religions and backgrounds, non-Catholics and Catholics alike.[3]

It provides services for children and youth; families in crisis; the hungry, the homeless, and people who are in danger of becoming homeless; the physically and emotionally challenged; and immigrants and refugees.[4]

Services to children and youth include day care, foster care, adoption services, after school / out of school time programs, summer camps, and community centers
Services to the hungry and homeless include emergency meals, eviction prevention, emergency shelters, temporary and transitional residences, and permanent affordable housing
Family services include information and referral, coordinating services, financial assistance, counseling, maternity services, and job readiness and placement.
Services to the physically and emotionally challenged include supportive housing for the mentally challenged, residences for special needs, early intervention and special education
Services for immigrants and refugees include reuniting families, preventing exploitation. obtaining work authorization and finding employment, legal services for immigrants, teaching English and civics, and representing those seeking asylum.

HistoryEdit

The Early Years: 1869 ~ 1917Edit

The roots of Catholic Charities New York can be traced to the Catholic Benevolent League, the first major Catholic charitable endeavor in New York, which cared for children abandoned by the War of 1812 and the Civil War. Their orphanage on Prince Street, the predecessor of the New York Foundling Hospital, began operating in 1869, the oldest agency of the Catholic Charities New York federation.[5]

The 1920s ~ 1940sEdit

During this time, the organization became a provider of emergency meals, financial assistance and expanded programs for the elderly. After World War II, the organization began offering employment services and job programs to support returning veterans, and care was provided for war widows and wives.

The 1950sEdit

During this decade, Catholic Charities New York opened the Kennedy Child Study Center for early intervention and special education of the mentally retarded, teaching basic skills and built the foundation enabling children to lead independent lives. It opened a day camp for disabled children, the Catholic Guild for the Blind provided counseling services, and Astor Home for Children was established in Rhinebeck, NY (and later expanded to the Bronx), a residential treatment center for emotionally disturbed children.

The 1960s ~ 2000sEdit

More than fifty new agencies developed within Catholic Charities New York from 1960 ~ 1980. In the 1980s, emergency homeless shelters opened, while advocacy efforts fought the loss of affordable housing stock.

StructureEdit

The executive staff of Catholic Charities New York is headquartered at the New York Catholic Center in Midtown Manhattan. The agencies are located throughout the counties of the Archdiocese of New York—the Bronx, Dutchess, Manhattan, Orange, Putnam, Rockland, Staten Island, Sullivan, Ulster and Westchester.

  • Msgr. Kevin Sullivan is the Executive Director

Board of TrusteesEdit

The Board of Trustees of Catholic Charities New York provides financial and governance support to the charity.[6]

  • Catherine R. Kinney serves as Chair of the Board; she is the retired President & Co-COO of NYSE Euronext.

ReferencesEdit

[7][8][9]http://online.wsj.com/article/AP4f1f88e5a37e43e087c8288334f69b6f.html[10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28]

  1. ^ "The 200 Largest U.S. Charities". Forbes.com. Forbes Magazine. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  2. ^ Barton, Noelle (October 16, 2011). "Many Big Charities Struggle to Raise Money in the Bad Economy". Chronicle of Philanthropy. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  3. ^ "Providing Help, Creating Hope: 2010 Annual Report, Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York". Annual Report. Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York. Archived from the original on 2012-04-24. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  4. ^ Poust, Mary Ann (May 18, 2011). "A Caring Federation Where Needs are Met". Catholic New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  5. ^ Poust, Mary Ann (May 18, 2011). "A Caring Federation Where Needs are Met". Catholic New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  6. ^ "Board of Trustees and Officers". Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York Website. Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of New York. Retrieved 27 March 2012.
  7. ^ Poust, Mary Ann (May 18, 2011). "A Caring Federation Where Needs are Met". Catholic New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  8. ^ DosSantos, Juliann (June 15, 2011). "Charities Assists Low-Income New Yorkers with Basic Housing Needs". Catholic New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  9. ^ "CGSHB & Rosalie Hall Pursue Merger". New York Nonprofit Press. July 14, 2011. Archived from the original on 2012-04-21. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  10. ^ "US says 68,000 more New Yorkers below poverty line". Wall Street Journal. September 13, 2011. Retrieved 31 October 2011.[dead link]
  11. ^ West, Melanie Grace (April 23, 2011). "Rebuilding After Restructuring". Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  12. ^ "Catholic Charities Nets $1.8 Million at Spring Gala". New York Nonprofit Press. June 10, 2011. Archived from the original on 2012-04-25. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  13. ^ "Catholic Charities USA Names New Board Members-Elect and Officers-Elect; Honors Members Slated for Retirement". Yahoo News. August 10, 2011. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  14. ^ Woods, John (August 25, 2011). "CYO Sports, Activities Form Vital Link to Parishes, Faith". Catholic New York. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  15. ^ "Archbishop Urges Caution in Face of Hurricane". Catholic New York. August 26, 2011. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  16. ^ Amodeo, Joseph (October 7, 2011). "Catholic Social Teaching and Bullying: A Call to Action". Huffington Post. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  17. ^ Sherry, Virginia M. (October 19, 2011). "Friday night Midnight Sports program marks year of successful interaction among dozens of young men 16 and older". Staten Island Advance. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  18. ^ Haskell, Kari (February 19, 2011). "A Season of Giving Motivates Donors in Greater Numbers". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  19. ^ Keh, Andrew (January 26, 2011). "In Highschool And Alone in a Homeless Shelter". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  20. ^ Mascia, Jennifer (January 28, 2011). "Burned Out of a Bronx Apartment". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  21. ^ Kenny, Steve (January 24, 2011). "Fighting for Education, but in Need of a Home". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  22. ^ Rueb, Emily S. (January 6, 2011). "Young Chef in a Quest to Become Independent". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  23. ^ Hughes, C. J. (November 24, 2010). "Mother Who Always Helped Now Needs Help". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  24. ^ Koppel, Niko (November 16, 2010). "Chinese Immigrant Hopes Sight and English Both Improve". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  25. ^ "'Things are Coming Together'". New York Times. December 17, 2010. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  26. ^ Warren, Mathew R. (November 12, 2010). "Homeless, But Hoping for a Return to College". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  27. ^ Bracken, Kassie (December 20, 2010). "Many Challenges, But Also Many Helping Hands". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.
  28. ^ Mascia, Jennifer (November 22, 2010). "Losing a Leg, But Keeping His Drive to Succeed". New York Times. Retrieved 31 October 2011.

External linksEdit