Budgam district

Budgam district is a district of the Indian administered union territory of Jammu and Kashmir. Created in 1979 with its headquarters at Budgam, it is the district with the highest amount of Shias found in the Kashmir valley.[1]

Budgam, Jammu and Kashmir
A flock of sheep on a green meadow, with woods in the background
Doodhpathri pastures in Budgam district
Location of Budgam district in Jammu and Kashmir
Location of Budgam district in Jammu and Kashmir
Coordinates: 34°1′12″N 74°46′48″E / 34.02000°N 74.78000°E / 34.02000; 74.78000Coordinates: 34°1′12″N 74°46′48″E / 34.02000°N 74.78000°E / 34.02000; 74.78000
Country India
Union TerritoryJammu and Kashmir
Established1979
Founded byAga Syed Yousuf
HeadquartersBudgam
Government
 • TypeDemocracy
Area
 • Total1,370 km2 (530 sq mi)
Population
 (2011)
 • Total753,745
 • Density537/km2 (1,390/sq mi)
Languages
 • OfficialUrdu Kashmiri
Time zoneUTC+5:30 (IST)
Vehicle registrationJK04
Sex ratio1.13250283 /
Literacy33.98%
VillagesKhansahib, Parnewa, Beerwah, Chadoora, Wahabpora
Websitebudgam.nic.in

AdministrationEdit

Budgam district is the closest district to capital Srinagar (11 km). Budgam district came into existence in 1979, prior to which it was part of Srinagar district. In former times, Budgam was a part of Baramulla district, when Srinagar itself was a constituent of the Anantnag district. It was then known as tehsil Sri Pratap. Historical records suggests that Budgam was also referred to as Pargana Deesu. According to the well-known chronicler Khawaja Azam Demari, the area was also known as Deedmarbag. Budgam District borders the districts of Baramullah and Srinagar in the north, Pulwama in the south and Poonch in the south west. It consists of eight blocks: Beerwah, Magam Budgam, B.K.Pora, Khan Sahib, Khag, Narbal and Chadoora.[2] Each block consists of a number of panchayats. The district is subdivided into the seven tehsils of Charari Sharief Tehsil, Magam tehsil, Beerwah Tehsil, Budgam Tehsil, Chadoora Tehsil, and Khansahib Tehsil, Khag Tehsil.[3]

DemographyEdit

Religion in Budgam district (2011)[4]

  Islam (97.65%)
  Hinduism (1.34%)
  Sikhism (0.74%)
  Christianity (0.20%)
  Buddhism (0.01%)
  Not stated (0.13%)

Budgam district: mother-tongue of population, according to the 2011 Census.[5]

  Gojri (3.01%)
  Hindi (0.69%)
  Kashmiri (94.78%)
  Punjabi (0.50%)
  Others (1.02%)

According to the 2011 census Budgam district has a population of 753,745,[6] roughly equal to the nation of Guyana[7] or the US state of Alaska,[8] making it 494th in India (out of a total of 640).[citation needed] The district has a population density of 554 inhabitants per square kilometre (1,430/sq mi).[6] Its population growth rate over the decade 2001-2011 was 24.14%.[6] Badgam has a sex ratio of 883 females for every 1000 males,[6] and a literacy rate of 56.08% (males 66.30%, females 44.85$),[6] an increase from 42.20% (males 53.13%, females 30.29%) in 2001.[6] Literacy is higher in urban areas (average 68.87%, male 79.46%, female 55.38%) than in rural areas (average 54.01%, male 64.00%, female 43.29%).[6]

Sex Ratio in Badgam District in 2011 Census.[4]
(no. females per 1,000 males)
Religion (and population) Sex Ratio
Muslim (pop 736,054)
915
Hindu (pop 10,110)
109
Sikh (pop 5,559)
674
Other (pop 2,022)
532
Total (pop 753,745)
894
Budgam district: religion, gender ratio, and % urban of population, according to the 2011 Census.[4]
Hindu Muslim Christian Sikh Buddhist Jain Other Not stated Total
Total 10,110 736,054 1,489 5,559 47 6 2 478 753,745
1.34% 97.65% 0.20% 0.74% 0.01% 0.00% 0.00% 0.06% 100.00%
Male 9,119 384,281 965 3,321 36 4 1 314 398,041
Female 991 351,773 524 2,238 11 2 1 164 355,704
Gender ratio (% female) 9.8% 47.8% 35.2% 40.3% 23.4% 33.3% 50.0% 34.3% 47.2%
Sex ratio
(no. of females per 1,000 males)
109 915 543 674 894
Urban 7,502 89,111 561 635 26 3 0 74 97,912
Rural 2,608 646,943 928 4,924 21 3 2 404 655,833
% Urban 74.2% 12.1% 37.7% 11.4% 55.3% 50.0% 0.0% 15.5% 13.0%

At the time of the 2011 Census of India, 94.78% of the population in the district spoke Kashmiri as their first language.[5]

Budgam district
mother-tongue of population, according to the 2011 Census.[5]
Mother tongue code Mother tongue People Percentage
001002 Assamese 333 0.04%
002007 Bengali 635 0.08%
004001 Dogri 592 0.08%
005018 Gujarati 119 0.02%
006102 Bhojpuri 152 0.02%
006195 Garhwali 66 0.01%
006207 Gojri/Gujjari/Gujar 22,706 3.01%
006240 Hindi 5,175 0.69%
006400 Marwari 55 0.01%
006439 Pahari 1,732 0.23%
007016 Kannada 154 0.02%
008005 Kashmiri 714,418 94.78%
011016 Malayalam 325 0.04%
012003 Meitei (Manipuri) 145 0.02%
013071 Marathi 750 0.10%
015043 Odia 425 0.06%
016038 Punjabi 3,759 0.50%
020027 Tamil 486 0.06%
021046 Telugu 421 0.06%
022015 Urdu 345 0.05%
040001 English 218 0.03%
082005 Lushai/Mizo 90 0.01%
109005 Shina 53 0.01%
Others 591 0.08%
Total 753,745 100.00%

EducationEdit

There are 98 schools in Budgam, both private and public, 33 of which are Higher Secondary Schools. Budgam has one government degree college, near Paller Village. Budgam is of one of backward districts in kashmir till date because some political issues. Budgam is district is also known to its great Muslim preachers as:Baba-Hanif-Ud-Din, locally the graveyard is known as "Baba sabin Ziyarath" which is situated at the most beautiful mountain which ends up in Rathsun, a small cute village. The people of Rathsun are very kind, as from the old times. Magam is one of the main town in budgam right now, because it is approximately at centre of the district budgam. Ompora, Charar Sharif, Kralpora and Soibugh are highly populated localities of Budgam district. Magam, Ichigam, Iskandarpora, Wahabpora villages of Budgam district are the biggest villages with Shia population.

AttractionsEdit

 
Valley in Budgam district

Budgam contains the only airport in Kashmir valley at Ichigam. The district's main tourist attractions are Doodhpathri, Yusmarg, Tosamaidan, Nilnag, Khag Mt Tatakuti, and Pehjan. District Budgam offers many stunning locales and has tremendous tourism potential that has largely remained untapped so far. The attractive places that can be visited are Doodpather, Yousmarg, Tosmaidan, Nilnag and Khag. Kani shawl adomed the caesar's court and was looked upon by Mughals and later by Nawabs as mark of nobility. In 1776 Napoleon presented a Kani shawl to his wife Josephine and with that took off a new fashion trend in Europe The revered shrine of Sheikh Noor-ud-din Wali can also be found in the Charari Sharief Tehsil of Budgam district. Asia's oldest/largest Chinar resides at Chattergam Budgam.

The Budgam railway station is located in Ompora town nearly 2.5 km from district headquarters and 9 km from city centre Lalchowk. It is the biggest railway station in Kashmir division. This railway station has administrative head controlling the rail service in Kashmir valley. Outside railway station Ompora (Budgam) there is a big hospital which is Budgam district's first private hospital.

Notable peopleEdit

Bilal Ahmad Bhat of Zagipora Chadoora

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Are Kashmiri Shias The Next Pandits?". 14 November 2013. Archived from the original on 21 June 2015. Retrieved 21 May 2014.
  2. ^ Statement showing the number of blocks in respect of 22 Districts of Jammu and Kashmir State including newly Created Districts Archived 10 September 2008 at the Wayback Machine dated 2008-03-13, accessed 2008-08-30
  3. ^ "ERO's and AERO's". Chief Electoral Officer, Jammu and Kashmir. Archived from the original on 22 October 2008. Retrieved 28 August 2008.
  4. ^ a b c C-1 Population By Religious Community – Jammu & Kashmir (Report). Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 28 July 2020.
  5. ^ a b c C-16 Population By Mother Tongue – Jammu & Kashmir (Report). Office of the Registrar General & Census Commissioner, India. Retrieved 18 July 2020.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g "District Census 2011: Badgam District". Census2011.co.in. 2011. Retrieved 20 August 2020.
  7. ^ US Directorate of Intelligence. "Country Comparison:Population". Retrieved 1 October 2011. Guyana 744,768
  8. ^ "2010 Resident Population Data". U. S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 1 January 2011. Retrieved 30 September 2011. Alaska 710,231

External linksEdit