Bryan H. Tucker is an American actor, comedian, and screenwriter, best known for being co-head writer for the TV program Saturday Night Live.[1]

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Bryan Tucker was born and raised in Chesterfield County, Virginia. After graduating from Clover Hill High School, Tucker attended University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.[2] While at UNC, Tucker regularly performed stand-up comedy and formed the comedy troupe Selected Hilarity.

CareerEdit

After graduating from UNC, Tucker toured the country with Selected Hilarity for three years.[3] The group broke up and Tucker moved to New York City to pursue performing. After Tucker broke into the standup scene, he would go on to write sketches and comedy bits for The Chris Rock Show.[4] He then went on to work for Mad TV, Tough Crowd with Colin Quinn, and Chappelle's Show before getting a job as an SNL writer in 2005.[5] After Seth Meyers left in the middle of Season 39 to host Late Night with Seth Meyers, both Rob Klein and Bryan Tucker were promoted to become new co-head writers alongside Colin Jost.[6] Although his primary function on the show has always been as a writer, Tucker has appeared in several bit performances, including "Roy Rules," an early SNL Digital Short.[7]

Awards and honorsEdit

Tucker has been nominated for eight Emmy awards and three Writers Guild (WGA) awards (2007, 2009, 2010) and won a Peabody Award for his work on Saturday Night Live during the 2008 Presidential Election.[8][9][10]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "History". NBC.com. NBC Universal. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  2. ^ "Richmond Native Named New Head Writer at SNL". Style Weekly. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  3. ^ "Alumni Profile: Bryan Tucker". Style Weekly. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  4. ^ "BEHIND THE COLLABORATIVE, COMPETITIVE PROCESS OF BEING A HEAD WRITER FOR "SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE"". Fast Company. Mansueto Ventures. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "Alumni Profile: Bryan Tucker". Blue and White Online. Wordpress. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  6. ^ "New Course for 'Weekend Update,' and All of 'SNL'". New York Times. The New York Times Company. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  7. ^ "Bryan Tucker: Writer". Saturday Night Live Transcripts. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  8. ^ "Bryan H. Tucker". IMDb.com. Amazon.com. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  9. ^ "Bryan Tucker". Television Academy. Retrieved March 12, 2015.
  10. ^ "Saturday Night Live Political Satire 2008 (NBC)". Peabody Awards. Retrieved March 12, 2015.