Ewell Goldyn Rhambo, known as Bo Rhambo, (born September 21, 1923, Austin, Texas - November 24, 1988 in Los Angeles, California[1]) was an American trumpeter and tenor saxophonist.

Originally a trumpeter, he organized his band playing local dances and parties. He then went on to play tenor saxophone. In 1952, he played with Joe Houston, then in 1953 recorded with Joe Liggins. In the 1950s, he led a trio with the pianist-organist Teddy Woods and drummer Bobby Pittman, recording for Cash Records then for Imperial in 1959-60.

Rhambo performed at the famed twelfth Cavalcade of Jazz held at Wrigley Field in Los Angeles which was produced by Leon Hefflin, Sr. on September 2, 1956. Also performing that day were Dinah Washington, The Mel Williams Dots, Julie Stevens, Little Richard, Chuck Higgin's Orchestra, Willie Hayden & Five Black Birds, The Premiers, Gerald Wilson and His 20-Pc. Recording Orchestra and Jerry Gray and his Orchestra.[2][3] He came back to perform at the final fourteenth Cavalcade of Jazz which was held at the Shrine Auditorium on August 3, 1958. Also performing that same day were Ray Charles with The Cookies and Ann Fisher, Ernie Freeman and his Band, Little Willie John, Sam Cooke, The Clark Kids and Sammy Davis Jr. who was there to crown the queen.[4]

In 1978, he played on a Joe Houston recording session (Kicking Back on Big Town 1004).

DiscographyEdit

  • Diane (Imperial)[5]
  • Enchanted Evening (Imperial)
  • Tender Moments (Imperial)

SourcesEdit

  • The Aladdin/Imperial Labels: A Discography (Michel Ruppli, 1991)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Rhambo, Ewell Goldwyn. "California, Death Index, 1940-1997". FamilySearch.org. Retrieved 22 July 2014.
  2. ^ “Stars Galore Set for Sept. Jazz Festival” Article The California Eagle Aug. 23, 1956.
  3. ^ “Cavalcade of Jazz Features Bo Rhambo” Article Los Angeles Sentinel Aug. 16, 1956.
  4. ^ Guralnick, Peter. (2005). Dream boogie : the triumph of Sam Cooke (1st ed.). New York: Little, Brown. ISBN 0316377945. OCLC 57393650.
  5. ^ Billboard Magazine review, March 9, 1957 (on Google Books)