Bitterfeld view

Bitterfeld (German pronunciation: [ˈbɪtɐfɛlt]) is a town in the district Anhalt-Bitterfeld, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. Since 1 July 2007 it has been part of the town Bitterfeld-Wolfen. It is situated approximately 25 km south of Dessau, and 30 km northeast of Halle (Saale). At the end of 2016, it had 40,964 inhabitants.[1]

History and descriptionEdit

 
Coat of arms
 
Rathaus

Bitterfeld was built by a colony of Flemish immigrants in 1153. It was captured by the landgrave of Meissen in 1476, and belonged thenceforth to Saxony, until it was ceded to Prussia in 1815.[2]

By 1900, Bitterfeld station was an important junction of the Berlin–Halle and the Magdeburg–Leipzig railways. The population at that time was 11,839; it manufactured drain-pipes, paper-roofing, and machinery, and had saw mills. There were also several coal mines in the vicinity. Owing to its pleasant situation and accessibility, it had become a favoured residence of business men of Leipzig and Halle.[2]

During the East Germany (GDR) years, it gained notoriety for its chemical industry complex which caused remarkably severe pollution, even by GDR standards. On 24 April 1959 it also was a scene for the Bitterfeld Conference, locally known as the "Bitterfelder Weg". This conference sought to connect the working class with the artists of the day to form a socialist national culture.[3]

In the 21st century Bitterfeld is still an industrial town and it stages the annual United Metal Maniacs metal festival.[4]

The former brown-coal open cast mine of Goitzsche, south-east of Bitterfeld, is a source of numerous fossils in Bitterfeld amber.

Historical populationEdit

1840 to 1939
Year Population
1840 04,649
1870 05,693
1880 06,531
1890 09,047
1925 18,384
1933 21,328
1939 23,949
1946 to 1995
Year Population
1946 32,833[EW 1]
1950 32,814[EW 2]
1960 31,687
1981 22,199
1984 21,279
1990 18,099[EW 3]
1995 16,868
2000 to 2006[5]
Year Population
2000 16,507
2001 16,237
2002 15,985
2003 15.798
2004 15,755
2005 15,728
2006 15,709[EW 4]

(from 1840 to 2006):[5]

Sons and daughters of the townEdit

  • Johann Ernst Altenburg (1736-1801), trumpeter and organist
  • Erwin Ding-Schuler (1912-1945), sturmbannführer and first camp doctor of Buchenwald
  • Peter Rasym (born 1953), musician, has been playing bass guitar since 1997 with the Puhdys

Other personalitiesEdit

 
Walter Rathenau 1921
  • August von Parseval (1861-1942), his impact airships developed by him were partly built in Bitterfeld.
  • Walther Rathenau (1867-1922), founder of Bitterfeld's chemical industry.
  • Klaus Staeck (born 1938), graphic artist, lawyer and president of the academy of the arts, grew up in Bitterfeld.

MayorsEdit

  • 1851-1863 Gottlieb Meuche
  • 1863-1873 Gustav Frischbier
  • 1873-1890 Robert Sommer († 1890)
  • 1890-1914 Hugo Hermann Adalbert Dippe (1853; † 1916)
  • 1915-1927 Ernst Albert Hermann Schmidt
  • 1927-1939 Arthur Erdmann Ebermann
  • 1939-1945 Erhard Johann Martin Nimz
  • 1943-1945 Walter Stieb (Interim)
  • 26   April 1945 to 30   August 1945 Gustav Dietrich (deselection by Soviet city commandant) († 1972)
  • September 1945 to 1946 Bernhard Moder
  • 1946-1949 Ernst Rettel
  • 1949-1950 Karl Salbach
  • 1950-1953 Heinz-Rudolf Strauch
  • 1953-1959 Wolfgang Stille
  • 1959-1971 Else Petrushka
  • 1971-1979 Max Dittbrenner
  • 1979-1982 Karlheinz Sohr
  • 1982-1990 Klaus Barth
  • 1990-1994 Edelgard Kauf
  • 1994-2007 Werner Rauball
  • 2007-2009 Horst Tischer
  • From 2010 Joachim Gülland

LiteratureEdit

  • Maron, Monika: Bitterfelder Bogen. Ein Bericht. Fischer Verlag, Frankfurt am Main 2009, ISBN 978-3-10-048828-2.
  • Lojewsky, Hannelore: Seh’n wir uns nicht in dieser Welt, so seh’n wir uns in Bitterfeld. In: Norbert Kühne: Individuelles Lernen wird an Bedeutung gewinnen. 100 Jahre Hans-Böckler-Berufskolleg Marl/Haltern, Marl 2009, S. 29–30.
  • Klaus Seehafer: Dann sehn wir uns in Bitterfeld. Tagebuch eines Jahres. Mitteldeutscher Verlag, Halle/S. 2009, ISBN 3-89812-664-1.
  • Bitterfeld und das untere Muldetal. Edition no. 1 Böhlau, Cologne; Weimar; Vienna 2004, ISBN 3-412-03803-2 (Werte der deutschen Heimat. Vol. 66).
  • Hackenholz, Dirk: Die elektrochemischen Werke in Bitterfeld 1914–1945. Ein Standort der IG-Farbenindustrie AG. LIT-Verlag, Münster 2004, ISBN 3-8258-7656-X.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ 29 October
  2. ^ 31 August
  3. ^ 3 October
  4. ^ 30 June

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Statistical information
  2. ^ a b   This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Bitterfeld". Encyclopædia Britannica. 4 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 13.
  3. ^ "Bitterfelder Konferenzen", Kulturpolitisches Wörterbuch (2nd print ed.), Berlin: Dietz Verlag, 1978
  4. ^ Festung Bitterfeld - 15 Jahre (1997-2012) (in German), retrieved 2013-01-18
  5. ^ a b Data source since 1995: Statistisches Landesamt Sachsen-Anhalt

External linksEdit

Coordinates: 51°37′26″N 12°19′48″E / 51.62389°N 12.33000°E / 51.62389; 12.33000