The Beecraft Queen Bee was an American V-tailed four-seat cabin monoplane, designed and built by Bee Aviation Associates (Beecraft).[1]

Beecraft Queen Bee
Beecraft Queen Bee in flight.jpg
The Queen Bee in flight
Role Four-seat cabin monoplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Bee Aviation Associates
Designer William S. Chana, Ken S. Coward
First flight 1960
Number built 1

DevelopmentEdit

The Queen Bee was an all-metal cantilever low-wing monoplane powered by a Lycoming O-320-A1A flat-four piston engine.[1] It had a V-tail and an electrically retractable tricycle landing gear.[1] The canopy shared a similar shape as the Ryan Navion. The wings were outfitted with fiberglass tip tanks. A 180 hp Lycoming O-360-A-1-A was planned as an optional engine.[2]

Only a prototype was built and the aircraft did not enter production. The Queen Bee prototype was destroyed when the original San Diego Aerospace Museum burned down in 1978.[3]

SpecificationsEdit

Data from Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62[4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 3 passengers
  • Length: 21 ft 10 in (6.65 m)
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 0 in (9.75 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 7 in (2.31 m)
  • Wing area: 130 sq ft (12 m2)
  • Empty weight: 1,190 lb (540 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2,150 lb (975 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-320-A1A flat-four piston engine, 180 hp (130 kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed Hartzell Model HC-82XG-1B

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 155 mph (249 km/h; 135 kn)
  • Stall speed: 55 mph (89 km/h; 48 kn)
  • Never exceed speed: 193 mph (311 km/h; 168 kn)
  • Range: 650 mi (565 nmi; 1,046 km)
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,600 m)
  • Rate of climb: 900 ft/min (4.6 m/s)

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c Orbis 1985, p. 516
  2. ^ Sport Aviation. April 1960. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ "American airplanes:Ba - Bll". www.aerofiles.com. 11 March 2009. Archived from the original on 16 January 2010. Retrieved 2009-12-23.
  4. ^ Taylor 1961, p. 205.

BibliographyEdit

  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  • Taylor, John W. R. (1961). Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1961–62. London: Sampson Low, Marston & Company.