Basic beryllium acetate

Basic beryllium acetate is the chemical compound with the formula Be4O(O2CCH3)6. This compound adopts a distinctive structure, but it has no applications and has been only lightly studied. It is a colourless solid that is soluble in organic solvents.

Basic beryllium acetate
Beacetate.png
Names
Systematic IUPAC name
Hexakis(μ-acetato)-μ(sup 4)-oxotetraberyllium
Other names
Beryllium oxyacetate
Beryllium oxide acetate
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.038.881
EC Number 242-785-4
Properties
C
12
H
18
Be
4
O
13
Molar mass 406.3122 g/mol
Appearance colorless
Melting point 285 °C (545 °F; 558 K)
Boiling point 330 °C (626 °F; 603 K)
Solubility in chloroform soluble
Hazards
Main hazards highly toxic
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 0.002 mg/m3
C 0.005 mg/m3 (30 minutes), with a maximum peak of 0.025 mg/m3 (as Be)[1]
REL (Recommended)
Ca C 0.0005 mg/m3 (as Be)[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
Ca [4 mg/m3 (as Be)][1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Contents

PreparationEdit

It can be prepared by treating basic beryllium carbonate with hot acetic acid.

2 Be
2
CO
3
(OH)
2
+ 6 AcOH → Be
4
O(AcO)
6
+ 5 H
2
O
+ 2 CO
2

Basic beryllium acetate is insoluble in water but soluble in chloroform, consistent with it being nonpolar. It melts and sublimes in a vacuum without decomposition.[2]

StructureEdit

"Basic acetates" consist of an ensemble of metal centres bound to a central oxide ion, and a collection of acetate ligands. Basic beryllium acetate has a tetrahedral Be4O6+ core with acetates (CH3CO2) spanning each of the pairs of Be2+ centres.[3][4] It consists of interlocking six-membered Be2O3C rings. The structure is relevant to its considerable stability (the compound is distillable at 330 °C).

 

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards #0054". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  2. ^ Moeller, T. (1950). "Basic Beryllium Derivatives of Organic Acids". In Audrieth, L. F. Inorganic Syntheses, Volume 3. John Wiley & Sons. p. 4. doi:10.1002/9780470132340.ch2. ISBN 978-0-470-13234-0.
  3. ^ Bragg, W. H. (1923). "Crystal Structure of Basic Beryllium Acetate". Nature. 111 (2790): 532. Bibcode:1923Natur.111..532B. doi:10.1038/111532a0.
  4. ^ Pauling, L.; Sherman, J. (1934). "The Structure of the Carboxyl Group. II. The Crystal Structure of Basic Beryllium Acetate" (PDF). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. 20 (6): 340. Bibcode:1934PNAS...20..340P. doi:10.1073/pnas.20.6.340.