The Aydinids or Aydinid dynasty (Modern Turkish: Aydınoğulları, Aydınoğulları Beyliği), also known as the Principality of Aydin and Beylik of Aydin (Aydın Beyliği ), was one of the Anatolian beyliks and famous for its seaborne raiding.

Principality of Aydin

Aydınoğulları
1308–1426
Flag of Aydinids
Flag
Beylik of Aydın's Map during its peak(1315-1375) highlighting:   Borders under Gazi Mehmed Bey   Borders after conquests under Umur Bey the Lion   Byzantine Empire territories   Other Western Anatolian Beyliks Black "X" showing Umur Bey's aids Red "X" showing Umur Bey's raids
Beylik of Aydın's Map during its peak(1315-1375) highlighting:
  Borders under Gazi Mehmed Bey
  Borders after conquests under Umur Bey the Lion
  Byzantine Empire territories
  Other Western Anatolian Beyliks
Black "X" showing Umur Bey's aids
Red "X" showing Umur Bey's raids
CapitalBirgi, Selçuk
Common languagesTurkish
Religion
Islam
GovernmentEmirate
History 
• Collapse of the Sultanate of Rum
1308
• Annexation by the Ottoman Empire
1426
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Sultanate of Rum
Ottoman Empire
Today part of Turkey
İsa Bey Mosque in Selçuk, built by the Aydinids in 1375

Contents

NameEdit

It is named after its founder Aydınoğlu Mehmed Bey.

CapitalEdit

Its capital was at first in Birgi, and later in Ayasoluk (present day Selçuk), was one of the frontier principalities established in the 14th century by Oghuz Turks after the decline of Sultanate of Rûm.

HistoryEdit

The Aydinids also held parts of the port of Smyrna (modern İzmir) all through their rule and all of the port city with intervals. Especially during the reign of Umur Bey, the sons of Aydın were a significant naval power of the time.[1] The naval power of Aydin played a crucial role in the Byzantine civil war of 1341–1347, where Umur allied with John VI Kantakouzenos, but also provoked a Latin response in the form of the Smyrniote crusades, that captured Smyrna from the emirate.

The Beylik was incorporated into the Ottoman Empire for the first time in 1390, and after the passage of Tamerlane in Anatolia in 1402 and the ensuing period of troubles that lasted until 1425, its territories became again part of the Ottoman realm, this time definitively.

ArchitectureEdit

The Beys of Aydin left important architectural works, principally in Birgi and Ayasoluk (Selçuk), their capital cities.

LegacyEdit

The city of Aydın (ancient Tralles) was named after the dynasty.

List of RulersEdit

  1. Muharizalsîn Gazi Mehmed Bey (1308-1334)[2]
  2. Umur Bey (1334-1348)[2]
  3. Khidr b. Mehmed (1348-1360)[2]
  4. Isa b. Mehmed(1360-1390)[2]
  • Ottoman rule (1390-1402)
  1. İsaoğlu Musa Bey (1402-1403)
  2. Musaoğlu II. Umur Bey (1403-1405)
  3. İzmiroğlu Cüneyd Bey (1405-1426)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Hans Theunissen. "Venice and the Turkoman Begliks of Menteşe and Aydın" (PDF). Utrecht University. Archived from Chapter V of Ottoman-Venetian diplomatics, the Ahd-Names the original Check |url= value (help) on 2008-02-27.
  2. ^ a b c d C.E. Bosworth, The New Islamic Dynasties, (Columbia University Press, 1996), 221.

BibliographyEdit

Coordinates: 38°05′21″N 27°44′16″E / 38.08917°N 27.73778°E / 38.08917; 27.73778