Antenorides (Ancient Greek: Ἀντηνορίδης) was a patronymic of ancient Greece, used in Greek mythology, from the mythological Antenor, and applied to his sons and descendants, the Antenoridae.[1][2] Pindar and the scholiast on Pindar suggest that the Antenoridae were worshipped in ancient Cyrene because of the legend of their migration to Cyrene from Troy.[3][4]

The historian Strabo makes reference to a lost play of Sophocles called the Antenoridae (Ἀντηνοριδαι),[5][6] which may have dealt with the history of the family following the Trojan War.[7]

According to the medieval writer and printer William Caxton in his translation of Raoul Lefèvre, Recuyell of the Historyes of Troye, "Antenorides" was also the name of one of the six gates of Troy, named after Antenor, though this is not recorded in any known ancient source. This gate is also later mentioned in William Shakespeare's play Troilus and Cressida.[8]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Virgil, Aeneid vi. 484
  2. ^ Homer, Iliad xi. 221
  3. ^ Pindar, Pythian v. 108
  4. ^ Segal, Charles (1998). Aglaia. Greek studies : interdisciplinary approaches. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 139, 146. ISBN 9780847686179. Retrieved 2016-01-08.
  5. ^ "The Journal of Roman Studies". The Journal of Roman Studies. Society for the Promotion of Roman Studies. 33-36. 1968. Retrieved 2016-01-08.
  6. ^ Jebb, Richard Claverhouse; Headlam, W.G.; Pearson, A.G. (2010). The Fragments of Sophocles. Cambridge Library Collection - Classics. Cambridge University Press. p. 86. ISBN 9781108009867. Retrieved 2016-01-08.
  7. ^ Marshall, C.W. (2014). The Structure and Performance of Euripides' Helen. Cambridge University Press. p. 65. ISBN 9781107073753. Retrieved 2016-01-08.
  8. ^ Davis, J. Madison; Frankforter, Daniel A. (2004). The Shakespeare Name Dictionary. Routledge. ISBN 9781135875718. Retrieved 2016-01-08.

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainLeonhard Schmitz, Leonhard (1870). "Antenorides". In Smith, William. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. p. 183.