American Association of Physical Anthropologists


The American Association of Physical Anthropologists (AAPA) is an international professional society of physical anthropologists, based in the United States. The organization publishes the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, a peer-reviewed science journal.

American Association of Physical Anthropologists
Founded1928
FocusAdvancing the science of biological/physical anthropology
Location
  • 950 Herndon Parkway, Suite 450
    Herndon, VA 20170
Members
2,200 (March 2019)
Key people
Leslie Aiello, President[1]Anne L. Grauer, President-elect[2]
Websitephysanth.org

Contents

HistoryEdit

The AAPA was first formed following a proposal by Czech-American anthropologist Aleš Hrdlička at the December 1928 New York meeting of Section H (Anthropology) of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). [3] Twenty anthropologists and anatomists voted in favor of the creation of an American Association of Physical Anthropologists, and an organizational committee of eight was formed (Fay Cooper Cole, Charles H. Danforth, GeorgeA. Dorsey, William K. Gregory, Earnest A. Hooton, Aleš Hrdlička, and Robert J. Terry). The first annual meeting of the AAPA was held in 1930 at the University of Virginia.

Name ChangeEdit

In 2018, at the 87th meeting of the AAPA in Austin, Texas, the Executive Committee stated its intention to hold a survey of AAPA members to assess their opinions on whether the AAPA should change its name, and what potential names could replace it. There were several motivations for the survey, including the fact that most academic departments, courses, and textbooks today use the term biological anthropology rather than physical anthropology, which evokes antiquated focuses of the discipline, such as racial typology. Moreover, most members of the AAPA self-identify as biological anthropologists, rather than physical anthropologists. The survey was administered online to AAPA members, and a majority voted in favor of changing the name, with the most popular name choice being American Association of Biological Anthropologists. [4] A formal vote among Regular members with take place at the 2019 meeting, with a final vote at the 2020 meeting.

MembershipEdit

There are over 2,200 members of the AAPA. There are three categories of membership: Regular, Student, and Special (persons with a professional interest in biological anthropology who do not meet the requirements of regular membership). Members of the AAPA can attend the annual meeting at a rate determined by their membership category, receive full access to AAPA publications and electronic communications, and submit nominations for elected positions. Regular members may vote and serve in elected positions. [5]

Annual MeetingEdit

The AAPA holds an annual meeting that is attended by scientists from around the world. The 2019 meeting will be held in Cleveland, Ohio. [6]

Position StatementsEdit

Biological Aspects of RaceEdit

As published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 101, pp 569-570, 1996, the AAPA offers an official position on biological aspects of race, based on evidence from anthropological (as well as biological, genetic, and social scientific) research. The statement emphasizes how all humans belong to a single species and share common descent, biological traits are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, and genetic diversity exists within all human populations. This position was first drafted as a revision of the 1964 UNESCO statement on race, which itself was first created in 1950 in response to World War II and Nazism.

Scientific Creationism and the National Center for Science Education (NCSE)Edit

As written in 1982, in agreement with the AAAS, the AAPA condemns the teaching of scientific creationism at public expense. [7]

AAPA Code of EthicsEdit

The AAPA has an official code of ethics emphasizing the importance of the well-being of the people and animals with which members work; informed consent; conservation of fossil, archaeological, and historical records; making data accessible and disseminating findings; teaching in a non-discriminatory fashion, and giving appropriate credit to all collaborators including students and trainees. [8] The AAPA also an official statement on sexual harassment, outlining the definition, prevention, and reporting of sexual harassment and assault within the professional community as well as expectations for behavior among members.



External linksEdit


  1. ^ "Executive Committee". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  2. ^ "Executive Committee". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  3. ^ Template:Alfonso, M.P. and Little, M.A., (2005), ''Juan Comas’s Summary History of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (1928–1968)'', Yearbook of Physical Anthropology48:163–195.
  4. ^ "Results of Name Change Survey". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  5. ^ "Membership". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  6. ^ "Annual Meetings". American Association of Physical Anthropologists. Retrieved March 25, 2019.
  7. ^ . American Association of Physical Anthropologists http://physanth.org/about/position-statements/scientific-creationism-and-ncse/teaching-scientific-creationism-public-schools/. Retrieved March 25, 2019. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ . American Association of Physical Anthropologists http://physanth.org/about/position-statements/aapa-code-ethics-sexual-harrassment/. Retrieved March 25, 2019. Missing or empty |title= (help)