Alexander (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος; c. 70–80 AD – c. 150) of Cotiaeum was a Greek grammarian, who is mentioned among the instructors of the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius.[1][2] We still possess an epitaph (λόγος ἐπιτάφιος) pronounced upon him by the rhetorician Aelius Aristides,[3][4] who had studied under Alexander.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Capitolinus, M. Ant. 2
  2. ^ Marcus Aurelius, i. ~ 10
  3. ^ Aelius Aristides, Vol. i. Orat. xii. p. 142, &c.
  4. ^ Schmitz, Leonhard (1867). "Alexander". In William Smith. Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. 1. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. p. 116.
  5. ^ Wells, Louise (1998). The Greek Language of Healing from Homer to New Testament Times. Walter de Gruyter. p. 93. ISBN 3-11-015389-0.

  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "Alexander". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. p. 116.