Abd al-Rahman or Abd ar-Rahman or Abdul Rahman or Abdurrahman (Arabic: عبد الرحمن‎ or occasionally عبد الرحمان; DMG ʿAbd ar-Raḥman) is a male Arabic Muslim given name, and in modern usage, surname. It is built from the Arabic words Abd, al- and Rahman. The name means "servant of the most gracious", ar-Rahman being one of the names of God in the Qur'an, which give rise to the Muslim theophoric names.[1][2]

PronunciationÁb-dur-ráh-mán or
Áb-dál-ráh-mán
GenderMale
Language(s)Arabic
Language(s)Arabic
Word/name'Abd + Ar-Rahman
MeaningServant of the Most Gracious
Region of origin7th-century Arabian peninsula
Related namesAmat al-Rahman (female variant), Rahman
See alsoAbdur Rahim, Abdullah

The letter A of the al- is unstressed, and can be transliterated by almost any vowel, often by u. Because the letter R is a sun letter, the letter l of the al- is assimilated to it. Thus although the name is written in Arabic with letters corresponding to Abd al-Rahman, the usual pronunciation corresponds to Abd ar-Rahman. Alternative transliterations include ‘Abd ar-Rahman, Abdurrahman, Abdul Rahman, Abdulrahman, Abdur Rehman, Abdul Rehman, Abidur Rahman, and others, all subject to variant spacing and hyphenation. Certain transliterations tend to be associated with certain areas, for example, Abdirahman in Somalia, and Abderrahmane in French-speaking North Africa

It may refer to:

Contents

MedievalEdit

BusinessEdit

EntertainmentEdit

Judges and lawyersEdit

Politicians and activistsEdit

International organizationsEdit

Historical nationsEdit

AfghanistanEdit

BangladeshEdit

IndiaEdit

IndonesiaEdit

IraqEdit

JordanEdit

LibyaEdit

MalaysiaEdit

MoroccoEdit

NigeriaEdit

PakistanEdit

Saudi ArabiaEdit

SomaliaEdit

SudanEdit

YemenEdit

Other placesEdit

PrisonersEdit

ReligionEdit

Science and academiaEdit

SoldiersEdit

SportsEdit

BasketballEdit

CricketEdit

FencingEdit

FootballEdit

RunningEdit

Other sportsEdit

Terrorists and militantsEdit

WritersEdit

Other personsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Salahuddin Ahmed (1999). A Dictionary of Muslim Names. London: Hurst & Company.
  2. ^ S. A. Rahman (2001). A Dictionary of Muslim Names. New Delhi: Goodword Books.