ADS 16402 is a binary star system, composed of two sun-like stars located approximately 525 light-years away in the constellation Lacerta. It was first identified by John Herschel in 1831.[4] The two stars are separated by 11.26 arcseconds which leads to a projected separation of roughly 1500 astronomical units at the distance of ADS 16402. The star system is estimated to be 1.9 ± 0.6 billion years old.[7] The secondary star ADS 16402 B is also designated HAT-P-1.

ADS 16402
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Lacerta[1]
ADS 16402 A
Right ascension  22h 57m 45.9211s[2]
Declination +38° 40′ 27.198″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) +10.0[3]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Right ascension  22h 57m 46.8443s[2]
Declination +38° 40′ 30.355″[2]
Apparent magnitude (V) +10.4[3]
Characteristics
ADS 16402 A
Spectral type F8[3]/G0V[4]
Apparent magnitude (J) 8.670±0.021[5]
Apparent magnitude (H) 8.467±0.044[5]
Apparent magnitude (K) 8.405±0.020[5]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Spectral type F8[3]/G0V[4]
Apparent magnitude (J) 9.156±0.026[5]
Apparent magnitude (H) 8.923±0.030[5]
Apparent magnitude (K) 8.858±0.018[5]
Astrometry
ADS 16402 A
Radial velocity (Rv)−3.43 ± 0.32[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 32.128±0.042[2] mas/yr
Dec.: −41.969±0.044[2] mas/yr
Parallax (π)6.1989 ± 0.0387[2] mas
Distance526 ± 3 ly
(161 ± 1 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)3.4 ± 0.3[4]
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Radial velocity (Rv)−2.94 ± 0.56[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: 32.384±0.041[2] mas/yr
Dec.: −41.751±0.044[2] mas/yr
Parallax (π)6.2615 ± 0.0381[2] mas
Distance521 ± 3 ly
(159.7 ± 1.0 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)3.7 ± 0.3[4]
Details
ADS 16402 A
Mass1.16 ± 0.11[4] M
Radius1.123 +0.14
−0.10
[4] R
Luminosity1.82 +0.75
−0.53
[4] L
Surface gravity (log g)4.36 ± 0.03[6] cgs
Temperature6251 ± 17[6] K
Metallicity [Fe/H]0.146 ± 0.014[6] dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i)7.1 ± 0.3[4] km/s
Age1.9 ± 0.6[7] Gyr
ADS 16402 B (HAT-P-1)
Mass1.151 +0.052
−0.051
[8] M
Radius1.174 +0.026
−0.027
[8] R
Luminosity1.585 +0.099
−0.094
[8] L
Surface gravity (log g)4.43 ± 0.02[6] cgs
Temperature6049 ± 8[6] K
Metallicity [Fe/H]0.155 ± 0.007[6] dex
Rotational velocity (v sin i)2.2 ± 0.2[4] km/s
Age1.9 ± 0.6[7] Gyr
Position (relative to ADS 16402 A)
Angular distance11.26 ± 0.03 [9]
Other designations
HJ 1832, CCDM J22578+3840, WDS J22578+3840[3]
ADS 16402 A: BD+37 4734p, PPM 88381[3]
ADS 16402 B: HAT-P-1, BD+37° 4734s, PPM 88382[3]
Database references
SIMBADADS 16402
ADS 16402 A
HAT-P-1

Contents

Planetary systemEdit

On September 14, 2006 the HATNet Project announced their first extrasolar planet discovery HAT-P-1b, a hot jupiter type gas giant in orbit around the secondary star ADS 16402B. Following the designation scheme used by the HATNet Project, the secondary star is known as HAT-P-1, and the planet itself designated HAT-P-1b.[4][10]

The HAT-P-1 planetary system[11][8]
Companion
(in order from star)
Mass Semimajor axis
(AU)
Orbital period
(days)
Eccentricity Inclination Radius
b 0.529 ± 0.020 MJ 0.05561 ± 0.00083 4.4652968 ± 0.0000018 0 85.634 ± 0.056° 1.319 ± 0.019 RJ

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Roman, Nancy G. (1987). "Identification of a Constellation From a Position". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 99 (617): 695–699. Bibcode:1987PASP...99..695R. doi:10.1086/132034. Vizier query form
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (August 2018). "Gaia Data Release 2: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 616. A1. arXiv:1804.09365. Bibcode:2018A&A...616A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201833051. Gaia Data Release 2 catalog entry for ADS 16402 A Gaia Data Release 2 catalog entry for ADS 16402 B
  3. ^ a b c d e f g "ADS16402". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2009-05-10.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Bakos, G. Á.; et al. (2007). "HAT-P-1b: A Large-Radius, Low-Density Exoplanet Transiting One Member of a Stellar Binary". The Astrophysical Journal. 656 (1): 552–559. arXiv:astro-ph/0609369. Bibcode:2007ApJ...656..552B. doi:10.1086/509874.
  5. ^ a b c d e f Skrutskie, M. F.; et al. (2006). "The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)". The Astronomical Journal. 131 (2): 1163–1183. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1163S. doi:10.1086/498708.Vizier catalog entry for AVizier catalog entry for B
  6. ^ a b c d e f Liu, F.; et al. (2014). "A high-precision chemical abundance analysis of the HAT-P-1 stellar binary: constraints on planet formation". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 442 (1): L51–L55. arXiv:1404.2112. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.442L..51L. doi:10.1093/mnrasl/slu055.
  7. ^ a b c Bonfanti, A.; et al. (2015). "Revising the ages of planet-hosting stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 575. A18. arXiv:1411.4302. Bibcode:2015A&A...575A..18B. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201424951.
  8. ^ a b c d Nikolov, N.; et al. (2014). "Hubble Space Telescope hot Jupiter transmission spectral survey: a detection of Na and strong optical absorption in HAT-P-1b". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 437 (1): 46–66. arXiv:1310.0083. Bibcode:2014MNRAS.437...46N. doi:10.1093/mnras/stt1859.
  9. ^ Faedi, F.; et al. (2013). "Lucky imaging of transiting planet host stars with LuckyCam". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 433 (3): 2097–2106. arXiv:1305.3795. Bibcode:2013MNRAS.433.2097F. doi:10.1093/mnras/stt885.
  10. ^ Aguilar, David A.; Pulliam, Christine (September 14, 2006). "Strange New Planet Baffles Astronomers" (Press release). Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard–Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Retrieved November 18, 2016.
  11. ^ Turner, Jake D.; et al. (2016). "Ground-based near-UV observations of 15 transiting exoplanets: constraints on their atmospheres and no evidence for asymmetrical transits". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 459 (1): 789–819. arXiv:1603.02587. Bibcode:2016MNRAS.459..789T. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw574.

External linksEdit

Coordinates:   22h 57m 47s, +38° 40′ 30″