5653 Camarillo (/ˌkæməˈr/ KAM-ə-REE-oh), provisional designation 1992 WD5, is a stony asteroid and near-Earth object of the Amor group, approximately 1.5 kilometers in diameter.

5653 Camarillo
Discovery [1]
Discovered byE. F. Helin
K. Lawrence
Discovery sitePalomar Obs.
Discovery date21 November 1992
Designations
MPC designation(5653) Camarillo
Pronunciation/ˌkæməˈr/ KAM-ə-REE-oh
Named after
Camarillo (city in California)
1992 WD5
NEO · Amor[1][2]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc43.23 yr (15,789 days)
Aphelion2.3402 AU
Perihelion1.2484 AU
1.7943 AU
Eccentricity0.3043
2.40 yr (878 days)
77.730°
0° 24m 36.36s / day
Inclination6.8739°
9.9739°
122.51°
Earth MOID0.2846 AU · 110.9 LD
Physical characteristics
Dimensions1.526 km[3]
1.53 km (taken)[4]
1.537±0.016 km[5][6]
1.573±0.287 km[7]
4.834±0.005 h[8]
4.8346±0.0002 h[9]
4.8350±0.0018 h[10]
0.2052[3]
0.220±0.097[7]
0.271±0.057[5][6]
S[4][a] · S/Sr[11]
15.83±0.2 (R)[b] · 15.980±0.007 (R)[10] · 16.1[1][5] · 16.28±0.3[7] · 16.31±0.33[12] · 16.42[4] · 16.42±0.13[3]

It was discovered on 21 November 1992, by American astronomers Eleanor Helin and Kenneth Lawrence at Palomar Observatory in California, United States.[2] The asteroid was named for the Californian town of Camarillo.[13]

Contents

Orbit and classificationEdit

Camarillo orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.2–2.3 AU once every 2 years and 5 months (878 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.30 and an inclination of 7° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

It has an Earth minimum orbit intersection distance, MOID, of 0.2846 AU (42,600,000 km), which corresponds to 110.9 lunar distances.[1]

A first precovery was taken at the Australian Siding Spring Observatory in 1974, extending the body's observation arc by 18 years prior to its official discovery observation at Palomar.[2]

Physical characteristicsEdit

The S-type asteroid has also been characterized as a Sr-subtype, a transitional group to the R-type asteroids.[11]

LightcurvesEdit

Between 1995 and 2015, several rotational lightcurves of Camarillo gave a well-defined rotation period of 4.834 hours with a brightness amplitude between 0.4 and 0.85 magnitude.[8][9][10][14][b]

Diameter and albedoEdit

According to the surveys carried out by NASA's space-based Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, Camarillo has an albedo between 0.21 and 0.25 with a corresponding diameter of 1.53 to 1.57 kilometers.[3][5][6][7]

NamingEdit

This minor planet was named after for the Californian town of Camarillo and its Camarillo Observatory (670). The town was named after Adolfo Camarillo (1864–1958), a well known regional rancher. The first discoverer is a former town resident.[13] The official naming citation was published by the Minor Planet Center on 4 August 2001 (M.P.C. 43189).[15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Dandy (2003) Optical colors of 56 near-Earth objects: trends with size and orbit. Summary figures for (5653) Camarillo at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)
  2. ^ a b Pravec (1999) web: rotation period 4.834 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.4 mag. Summary figures for (5653) Camarillo at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 5653 Camarillo (1992 WD5)" (2017-06-15 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 21 June 2017.
  2. ^ a b c "5653 Camarillo (1992 WD5)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  4. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (5653) Camarillo". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J.; Masiero, J.; McMillan, R. S.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (December 2011). "NEOWISE Observations of Near-Earth Objects: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 743 (2): 17. arXiv:1109.6400. Bibcode:2011ApJ...743..156M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/743/2/156. Retrieved 5 December 2016.
  7. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; McMillan, R. S.; et al. (November 2012). "Physical Parameters of Asteroids Estimated from the WISE 3-Band Data and NEOWISE Post-Cryogenic Survey". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 760 (1): 6. arXiv:1210.0502. Bibcode:2012ApJ...760L..12M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/760/1/L12. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  8. ^ a b Cooney, Walter R., Jr.; Gross, John; Terrell, Dirk; Reddy, Vishnu; Dyvig, Ron (June 2007). "Lightcurve Results for 486 Cremona, 855 Newcombia 942 Romilda, 3908 Nyx, 5139 Rumoi, 5653 Camarillo, (102866) 1999 WA5". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (2): 47–49. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...47C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  9. ^ a b Galad, Adrian; Kornos, Leonard (June 2008). "A Sample of Lightcurves from Modra". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 35 (2): 78–81. Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...78G. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  10. ^ a b c Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  11. ^ a b Thomas, Cristina A.; Emery, Joshua P.; Trilling, David E.; Delbó, Marco; Hora, Joseph L.; Mueller, Michael (January 2014). "Physical characterization of Warm Spitzer-observed near-Earth objects". Icarus. 228: 217–246. arXiv:1310.2000. Bibcode:2014Icar..228..217T. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.10.004.
  12. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 5 June 2016.
  13. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(5653) Camarillo". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (5653) Camarillo. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 479. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_5353. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  14. ^ Mottola, S.; de Angelis, G.; di Martino, M.; Erikson, A.; Harris, A. W.; Hahn, G.; et al. (March 1995). "The EUNEASO Photometric Follow-up Program". Abstracts of the Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. 26: 1003. Bibcode:1995LPI....26.1003M. Retrieved 1 February 2016.
  15. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 5 June 2016.

External linksEdit