48 Hour Film Project

The 48 Hour Film Project is an annual film competition in which teams of filmmakers are assigned a genre, a character, a prop, and a line of dialogue, and have 48 hours to create a short film containing those elements. The competition has been active since 2001.[1]

Logo for the 48 Hour Film Project, as of 2020

In the weeks after the 48 hours of filmmaking are complete, screenings are held in each city and a winner is chosen to represent that city at Filmapalooza—a festival that features "best of" screenings of the winners from each city.[1] Filmapalooza is hosted by a different city each year.[1] The most recent Filmapalooza, in 2019, was held in Orlando, Florida.[2]

BackgroundEdit

The competition began in Washington, D.C., in 2001.[1] It was created by Mark Ruppert and is produced by Ruppert and Liz Langston.[1] In 2009, nearly 40,000 filmmakers made around 3,000 films in 76 cities across the globe.[1]

After the 48 hours of filmmaking are complete, each city screens all the competing films, and a jury subsequently vote on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd best films. Most cities also give out awards to their films in several categories, including directing, writing, and acting; an Audience Choice award is sometimes voted on as well, by the audience of the screenings in each city.[1]

The film that wins 1st place goes on to represent their city at Filmapalooza—a festival that features "best of" screenings of the winners from each city.[1] Filmapalooza is hosted by a different city each year.[1] The most recent Filmapalooza was held in Paris, France.[2]

Related competitionsEdit

In 2003, the creators of the 48 Hour Film Project created the National Film Challenge, which is an annual three-day film competition with roughly the same structure as the 48 Hour Film Project, except that the films are mailed in when completed and then screened on-line, rather than being shown in movie theater in the local city.[3]

In 2008, this competition was opened to filmmakers from around the world and although the name was not officially changed, the runner-up hailed from Utrecht, Netherlands.[3]

The organizers of the Auckland competition split off from the 48 Hour Film Project after the 2003 competition and formed 48HOURS, which is now a wholly separate organization that runs a similar competition in New Zealand.[4]

In 2006, the producers of the National Film Challenge began the International Documentary Challenge (also known as the "Doc Challenge") in which participating filmmakers produce a documentary in under five days.[5]

In 2011, 48 Go Green split off from 48 Hour Film Project to become a separate, independent organization. 48 Go Green had a similar style of competition. The primary differences were an ecological theme, and an entirely online competition to allow worldwide participation. 48 Go Green and 48 Hour Film Project parted ways following a disagreement between 48 Hour Film Project and co-producers Francesco Vitali and Christos Siametis.[6][7] 48 Go Green soon became 48FILM Project.[8]

List of participating locationsEdit

All cities listed below have participated every year since their introduction, unless otherwise noted.

Starting in 2001Edit

Starting in 2002Edit

Starting in 2003Edit

Starting in 2004Edit

Starting in 2005Edit

Starting in 2006Edit

Starting in 2007Edit

Starting in 2008Edit

Starting in 2009Edit

Starting in 2010Edit

Starting in 2011Edit

Starting in 2012Edit

Starting in 2014Edit

The competition organizers maintain records online that indicate which cities have participated in past years.[9][10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19]

AwardsEdit

In each participating city, one participant is chosen as the City Winner and their film is submitted to a jury for consideration against other City Winners for the competition year. The jury's selection from among these films is named the year's winner and is honored at Filmapalooza, the finale festival for the 48 Hour Film Project.[20]

Year Film Genre Team
(Director)
Nationality
2002 White Bitch Down Mystery Boondogglers
Jon Hill
  Atlanta, Georgia
2003 Baggage Fantasy Slapdash Films
Kent Nichols
  Los Angeles, California
2004 Moved Science fiction Nice Hat Productions
Scott Ippolito
Jim Issa
  Atlanta, Georgia
2005 Mimes of the Prairie Musical or Western Team Last to Enter
John Hansen
  Des Moines, Iowa
2006 Tooth and Nail Mockumentary Cinema Syndicate
Sean McGrath
  Portland, Oregon
2007 TimeCatcher Superhero No Budget Productions
Amit Saragosi
  Tel Aviv, Israel
2008 Transfert Horror FatCat Films
Pierre Zandrowicz
  Paris, France
2009 Nicht nur der Himmel ist blau Mockumentary Sharktankcleaners
Oliver Walser
  Berlin, Germany
2010 The Girl Is Mime Silent film Far From Home
Tim Bunn
  London, England
2011 In Captivity Superhero Jpixx Films
Jon Abrahams
  Hampton Roads, Virginia
2012 Jacques Serres Dark comedy Les Productions avec Volontiers
François Goetghebeur
Nicolas Lebrun
  Paris, France
2013 Geen Klote! Unknown De Filmband
Jon Karthaus
Melvin Simons
  Amsterdam, Netherlands
2014 These Dirty Words Romance Jear Productions and The Pitchery
Jens Rijsdijk
  Rotterdam, Netherlands
2015 Unforgettable Fish out of water Take 23

Marco Grandia

  Amsterdam, Netherlands

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i "The 48 Hour Film Project: What We're About". 48 Hour Film Project. April 2010. Archived from the original on 25 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-04.
  2. ^ a b "Filmapalooza 2019 @ 48 Hour Film Project". www.48hourfilm.com. Retrieved 2019-11-01.
  3. ^ a b "National Film Challenge". National Film Challenge. April 2010. Retrieved 2009-04-04.
  4. ^ "About HP48Hours | 48HOURS 2018". www.48hours.co.nz. Retrieved 2018-08-17.
  5. ^ "Doc Challenge". Doc Challenge. April 2010. Archived from the original on 2 April 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-04.
  6. ^ "48 Go Green Disclaimer". Retrieved 19 July 2012.
  7. ^ "48 Go Green: The Creation". Creamyw Ltd. Retrieved 19 July 2012.
  8. ^ Jorge Guevara (20 February 2014). "The 48 Film Project Officially Announced". San Diego Red.
  9. ^ "48HFP 2011 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. December 2011. Retrieved 2011-12-14.
  10. ^ "48HFP 2010 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. January 2011. Archived from the original on 15 January 2011. Retrieved 2011-01-18.
  11. ^ "48HFP 2009 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. November 2009. Archived from the original on 12 December 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-10.
  12. ^ "48HFP 2008 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. April 2010. Archived from the original on 25 March 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-04.
  13. ^ "48HFP 2007 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 3 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  14. ^ "48HFP 2006 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 5 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  15. ^ "48HFP 2005 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  16. ^ "48HFP 2004 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  17. ^ "48HFP 2003 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  18. ^ "48HFP 2002 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  19. ^ "48HFP 2001 Tour". 48 Hour Film Project. June 2009. Archived from the original on 19 May 2009. Retrieved 2009-06-15.
  20. ^ "Filmapalooza". 48 Hour Film Project. April 2010. Archived from the original on 5 May 2010. Retrieved 2010-04-04.

External linksEdit