2022 United States gubernatorial elections

The 2022 United States gubernatorial elections will be held on November 8, 2022, in 36 states and three territories. In addition, special elections may take place (depending on state law) if other gubernatorial seats are vacated.

2022 United States gubernatorial elections

← 2021 November 8, 2022 2023 →

39 governorships
36 states; 3 territories

2022 United States gubernatorial elections.svg
     Democratic incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Democrat
     Republican incumbent      Term-limited or retiring Republican
     No election

As most governors serve four year terms, the last regular gubernatorial elections for all but two of the seats took place in 2018. The governors of New Hampshire and Vermont, each of whom serve two year terms, ran in the 2020 elections. The 2022 gubernatorial elections will take place concurrently with several other federal, state, and local elections.

Race summaryEdit

State Governor Party First elected Last race Status Candidates
Alabama Kay Ivey Republican 2017[a] 59.5% R Eligible Dean Odle (R)
Alaska Mike Dunleavy Republican 2018 51.4% R Eligible
Arizona Doug Ducey Republican 2014 56.0% R Term-limited
Arkansas Asa Hutchinson Republican 2014 65.3% R Term-limited Tim Griffin (R)[1]
Leslie Rutledge (R)[2]
California Gavin Newsom Democratic 2018 61.9% D Eligible Chaz Flemmings (NPP)[3]
Adriel Hampton (NPP)[4]
Laura Smith (R)[5]
Colorado Jared Polis Democratic 2018 53.4% D Eligible
Connecticut Ned Lamont Democratic 2018 49.4% D Eligible
Florida Ron DeSantis Republican 2018 49.6% R Eligible
Georgia Brian Kemp Republican 2018 50.2% R Eligible
Hawaii David Ige Democratic 2014 62.7% D Term-limited Marissa Kerns (R)[6]
Andria Tupola (R)[7]
Idaho Brad Little Republican 2018 59.8% R Eligible
Illinois J. B. Pritzker Democratic 2018 54.5% D Eligible
Iowa Kim Reynolds Republican 2017[b] 50.3% R Eligible
Kansas Laura Kelly Democratic 2018 48.0% D Eligible
Maine Janet Mills Democratic 2018 50.9% D Eligible Paul LePage (R)
Maryland Larry Hogan Republican 2014 55.4% R Term-limited Robin Ficker (R)[8]
Peter Franchot (D)[9]
Massachusetts Charlie Baker Republican 2014 66.6% R Eligible
Michigan Gretchen Whitmer Democratic 2018 53.3% D Eligible
Minnesota Tim Walz DFL 2018 53.8% D Eligible
Nebraska Pete Ricketts Republican 2014 59.0% R Term-limited Bob Krist (D)[10]
Nevada Steve Sisolak Democratic 2018 49.4% D Eligible
New Hampshire Chris Sununu Republican 2016 65.2% R Eligible
New Mexico Michelle Lujan Grisham Democratic 2018 57.2% D Eligible
New York Andrew Cuomo Democratic 2010 59.6% D Running Mike Carpinelli (R)[11]
Andrew Cuomo (D)[12]
Ohio Mike DeWine Republican 2018 50.4% R Running Mike DeWine (R)[13]
Oklahoma Kevin Stitt Republican 2018 54.3% R Eligible
Oregon Kate Brown Democratic 2015[c] 50.1% D Term-limited
Pennsylvania Tom Wolf Democratic 2014 57.8% D Term-limited
Rhode Island Gina Raimondo Democratic 2014 52.6% D Term-limited
South Carolina Henry McMaster Republican 2017[d] 54.0% R Running Henry McMaster (R)[14]
South Dakota Kristi Noem Republican 2018 51.0% R Eligible
Tennessee Bill Lee Republican 2018 59.6% R Running Bill Lee (R)
Texas Greg Abbott Republican 2014 55.8% R Running Greg Abbott (R)[15]
Vermont Phil Scott Republican 2016 68.8% R Eligible
Wisconsin Tony Evers Democratic 2018 49.5% D Eligible
Wyoming Mark Gordon Republican 2018 67.1% R Eligible

Republican incumbents eligible for re-electionEdit

Kay Ivey (Alabama)Edit

Governor Kay Ivey took office on April 10, 2017 upon the resignation of Robert J. Bentley and was elected to a full term at her own right in 2018 with 59.5% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election for a second full term, but has not yet stated whether she will do so. Opelika, Alabama, pastor Dean Odle has announced he will seek the Republican nomination for Governor.[16]

Mike Dunleavy (Alaska)Edit

Governor Mike Dunleavy was elected in 2018 with 51.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Ron DeSantis (Florida)Edit

Governor Ron DeSantis was elected in 2018 with 49.6% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so. Former mayor of Tallahassee and Democratic nominee for governor in 2018 Andrew Gillum will not run against DeSantis again, after stating on March 16, 2020, he would enter rehabilitation, citing struggles with alcohol after narrowly losing the 2018 Florida gubernatorial race.[17][18] Florida commissioner of agriculture Nikki Fried is a potential Democratic candidate.[19]

Brian Kemp (Georgia)Edit

Governor Brian Kemp was elected in 2018 with 50.2% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Potential Democratic candidates include former minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives and Democratic nominee for governor in 2018 Stacey Abrams,[20] and former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed. [21] Current Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms is also a potential Democratic candidate.

Brad Little (Idaho)Edit

Governor Brad Little was elected in 2018 with 59.8% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Kim Reynolds (Iowa)Edit

Governor Kim Reynolds took office on May 24, 2017, upon the resignation of Terry Branstad and was elected to a full term at her own right in 2018 with 50.3% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election for a second full term, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Charlie Baker (Massachusetts)Edit

Governor Charlie Baker was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 66.6% of the vote. Because Massachusetts does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a third term, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Chris Sununu (New Hampshire)Edit

Governor Chris Sununu was re-elected in 2020 with 62.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election for a fourth term, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Mike DeWine (Ohio)Edit

Governor Mike DeWine was elected in 2018 with 50.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

DeWine may face a primary challenge from his right due to his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic in Ohio, and his policies on gun control.[22] Former Ohio House of Representatives Speaker Larry Householder was reportedly considering a campaign before he was indicted on federal bribery charges.[23][24]

Potential Democratic candidates include Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley,[25] Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper, U.S. Representative and 2020 presidential candidate Tim Ryan, Ohio House of Representatives Minority Leader Emilia Sykes,[26] and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.[27][22]

Kevin Stitt (Oklahoma)Edit

Governor Kevin Stitt was elected in 2018 with 54.3% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so. Former State Senator and physician Ervin Yen has filed paperwork to challenge Stitt should the governor decide to run for reelection.[28]

Henry McMaster (South Carolina)Edit

Governor Henry McMaster took office on January 24, 2017, upon the resignation of Nikki Haley and was elected to a full term at his own right in 2018 with 54% of the vote. He is running for re-election for a second full term.[14]

Kristi Noem (South Dakota)Edit

Governor Kristi Noem was elected in 2018 with 51% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Bill Lee (Tennessee)Edit

Governor Bill Lee was elected in 2018 with 59.6% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, and in September of 2020 announced his intent to do so.

Greg Abbott (Texas)Edit

Governor Greg Abbott was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 55.8% of the vote. Because Texas does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a third term, and has announced he will do so.[15] Comedian and talk show host Chad Prather is a potential Republican candidate.[29] Former 2020 presidential candidate, former U.S. representative, and Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate in 2018 Beto O'Rourke is a potential Democratic candidate. Former United States secretary of housing and urban development, and former mayor of San Antonio Julián Castro, and his twin brother and U.S representative Joaquin Castro,[30] are potential Democratic candidates as well.[20]

Phil Scott (Vermont)Edit

Governor Phil Scott was re-elected in 2020 with 68.8% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election for a fourth term, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Mark Gordon (Wyoming)Edit

Governor Mark Gordon was elected in 2018 with 67.1% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Ralph Torres (Northern Mariana Islands)Edit

Governor Ralph Torres became governor on December 29, 2015, upon the death of incumbent governor Eloy Inos.[31][32] He was elected to his first full term in 2018 with 62.2% of the vote. He is eligible to run for a second full term.

Retiring and term-limited Republican incumbentsEdit

Doug Ducey (Arizona)Edit

Governor Doug Ducey was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 56% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Arizona Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term. Potential Republican candidates include Attorney General of Arizona Mark Brnovich,[33] U.S Representative David Schweikert,[34] and State Treasurer of Arizona Kimberly Yee.[35]

Democratic Secretary of State of Arizona Katie Hobbs has said that she's seriously considering a campaign, and has given a decision timetable of early 2021. Other potential Democratic candidates include Arizona House Minority Leader Charlene Fernandez, and U.S Representative Greg Stanton.[36]

Asa Hutchinson (Arkansas)Edit

Governor Asa Hutchinson was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 65.3% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Arkansas Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third term. Sarah Huckabee Sanders, former White House Press Secretary and the daughter of former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee is a potential Republican candidate.

Larry Hogan (Maryland)Edit

Governor Larry Hogan was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 55.4% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Maryland Constitution in 2022 and will therefore be unable to seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Pete Ricketts (Nebraska)Edit

Governor Pete Ricketts was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 59% of the vote. He will be term-limited by the Nebraska Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Democratic incumbents eligible for re-electionEdit

Gavin Newsom (California)Edit

Governor Gavin Newsom was elected in 2018 with 61.9% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Jared Polis (Colorado)Edit

Governor Jared Polis was elected in 2018 with 53.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Ned Lamont (Connecticut)Edit

Governor Ned Lamont was elected in 2018 with 49.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so. Republican nominee for governor in 2018 Bob Stefanowski may run against Lamont again.[37]

J. B. Pritzker (Illinois)Edit

Governor J. B. Pritzker was elected in 2018 with 54.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Laura Kelly (Kansas)Edit

Governor Laura Kelly was elected in 2018 with 48% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Janet Mills (Maine)Edit

Governor Janet Mills was elected in 2018 with 50.9% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so. Former Republican governor Paul LePage has announced that he will run again.[38]

Gretchen Whitmer (Michigan)Edit

Governor Gretchen Whitmer was elected in 2018 with 53.3% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Tim Walz (Minnesota)Edit

Governor Tim Walz was elected in 2018 with 53.8% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Steve Sisolak (Nevada)Edit

Governor Steve Sisolak was elected in 2018 with 49.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Michelle Lujan Grisham (New Mexico)Edit

Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham was elected in 2018 with 57.2% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Andrew Cuomo (New York)Edit

Governor Andrew Cuomo was re-elected to a third term in 2018 with 59.6% of the vote. Because New York does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a fourth term. On May 28, 2019, Cuomo announced that he would run for re-election for a fourth term in 2022.[12][39]

Tony Evers (Wisconsin)Edit

Governor Tony Evers was elected in 2018 with 49.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Lou Leon Guerrero (Guam)Edit

Governor Lou Leon Guerrero was elected in 2018 with 50.8% of the vote. She is eligible to run for reelection.

Albert Bryan (U.S. Virgin Islands)Edit

Governor Albert Bryan was elected in 2018 with 54.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for reelection.

Retiring and term-limited Democratic incumbentsEdit

David Ige (Hawaii)Edit

Governor David Ige was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 62.7% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Hawaii Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Kate Brown (Oregon)Edit

Governor Kate Brown took office on February 18, 2015 upon the resignation of John Kitzhaber. She was subsequently elected in the gubernatorial special election in 2016 and was re-elected to a full term in 2018 with 50.1% of the vote. She will be term-limited by the Oregon Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for another full term until 2026.

Tom Wolf (Pennsylvania)Edit

Governor Tom Wolf was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 57.8% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Pennsylvania Constitution in 2022 and will therefore be unable to seek re-election for a third consecutive term. Potential Democratic candidates include state treasurer Joe Torsella, state attorney general Josh Shapiro and Philadelphia mayor Jim Kenney.[40] Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman is also expected to seek statewide or federal office in 2022.[41][42]

Gina Raimondo (Rhode Island)Edit

Governor Gina Raimondo was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 52.6% of the vote. She will be term-limited from the Rhode Island Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Kay Ivey took office in 2017 after her predecessor (Robert J. Bentley) resigned. She was subsequently elected in the 2018 Alabama gubernatorial election.
  2. ^ Kim Reynolds took office in 2017 after her predecessor (Terry Branstad) resigned. She was subsequently elected in the 2018 Iowa gubernatorial election.
  3. ^ Kate Brown took office in 2015 after her predecessor (John Kitzhaber) resigned. She was subsequently elected in the 2016 Oregon gubernatorial special election.
  4. ^ Henry McMaster took office in 2017 after his predecessor (Nikki Haley) resigned. He was subsequently elected in the 2018 South Carolina gubernatorial election.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Lt. Gov. Tim Griffin says he's running for Arkansas governor". KAIT. Associated Press. August 5, 2019. Retrieved August 6, 2019.
  2. ^ "Arkansas' attorney general says she's running for governor". AP NEWS. July 1, 2020. Retrieved July 29, 2020.
  3. ^ Flemmings, Chaz (February 12, 2020). "Governor Gavin Newsom , Homelessness in California & Los Angeles Plus A Major Announcement". Thinking Real (Podcast). RSS America. Event occurs at 03:28. Retrieved February 12, 2020.
  4. ^ Hern, Alex (October 29, 2019). "California man runs for governor to test Facebook rules on lying". The Guardian. Retrieved November 3, 2019.
  5. ^ "Laura Smith for CA Governor". Laura Smith for CA Governor. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  6. ^ "ELECTMARISSA.COM".
  7. ^ Nagaoka, Ashley (August 15, 2019). "Believe it or not, race to replace Gov. Ige is already taking shape". Hawaii News Now. Retrieved October 3, 2019.
  8. ^ "Robin Ficker Running for Governor » Red Maryland". Red Maryland. April 14, 2020.
  9. ^ Witte, Brian (January 9, 2020). "Maryland Comptroller Says He's Running for Governor". Nbcwashington.com. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  10. ^ Maddox, Tiffany (April 26, 2019). "Senator Bob Krist will run for governor for 2022". KFXL. Retrieved June 28, 2019.
  11. ^ "Lewis County sheriff announces candidacy for New York governor". WKTV News.
  12. ^ a b "Cuomo says he'll run for fourth term as NY governor". TheHill. May 28, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  13. ^ Balmert, Rick Rouan and Jessie. "Trump hints at primary challenge for DeWine in tweet". The Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  14. ^ a b "SC Gov. Henry McMaster already gearing up for 2022 re-election bid | Palmetto Politics". postandcourier.com. May 19, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  15. ^ a b Jonathan Tilove. "Tilove: Abbott says Biden will fade and Trump will win Texas - News - Austin American-Statesman - Austin, TX". Statesman.com. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  16. ^ Wilson, Brent (September 15, 2020). "Controversial AL Pastor Dean Odle To Run For Governor". Bama Politics. Retrieved September 23, 2020.
  17. ^ "Democratic star ex-mayor Andrew Gillum to enter rehab". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved March 17, 2020.
  18. ^ "Gillum to seek treatment, withdraw from public life". TheHill. March 15, 2020. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  19. ^ "Face off: New Nikki Fried stickers continue popping up statewide". Floridapolitics.com. February 19, 2020. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  20. ^ a b Steve Phillips (December 13, 2018). "Dear Beto, Andrew, and Stacey—Run Again". The Nation. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  21. ^ Bluestein, Greg (May 23, 2016). "Kasim Reed: 'I think I've got another campaign in me'". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  22. ^ a b Larkin, Brett (August 8, 2020). "'Rule of 3' does not bode well for Mike DeWine". Cleveland.com. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  23. ^ O'Donnell, Tim (July 21, 2020). "Ohio governor calls for state GOP house speaker to resign following bribery charges". The Week. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  24. ^ O'Donnell, Tim (July 30, 2020). "Ex-Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder indicted in federal bribery case". Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  25. ^ Christian, Paula (February 14, 2020). "Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley exploring run for Ohio governor in 2022". WCPO Cincinnati. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  26. ^ Williams, Jason (February 14, 2020). "PX column: Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley launches 2022 governor's campaign. Does moderate Democrat have a shot in Trump-controlled Ohio?". Cincinnati.com. Retrieved April 14, 2020.
  27. ^ Williams, Jason (August 8, 2019). "She's shown compassion and stood up to Trump. Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley has been a rock star. What's it mean for her future?". Cincinnati.com. Retrieved March 10, 2020.
  28. ^ https://nondoc.com/2020/11/05/ervin-yen-challenging-kevin-stitt/
  29. ^ @watchchad (July 2, 2020). "I'm running for Governor of Texas" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  30. ^ Svitek, Patrick (July 16, 2020). "Spurred by Gov. Greg Abbott's coronavirus handling, Democratic strategists launch PAC to defeat him in 2022". The Texas Tribune. Retrieved September 12, 2020.
  31. ^ Rabago, Mark (December 29, 2015). "Gov. Eloy Inos Passes Away". Saipan Tribune. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  32. ^ Manglona, Thomas (December 29, 2015). "CNMI Governor Eloy Inos Dies". Pacific News Center. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2015.
  33. ^ "Already playing politics for governor". Herald/Review. June 29, 2020. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  34. ^ "U.S. Rep. David Schweikert floats run for Arizona governor in 2022". KTAR. October 26, 2017. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  35. ^ Roberts, Laurie (October 19, 2020). "Kimberly Yee is acting an awful lot like ... Doug Ducey. Is she setting herself up to replace him?". Delaware Online. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  36. ^ Herstam, Chris (January 6, 2020). "Katie Hobbs for governor – already?". The Times-Gazette. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  37. ^ https://www.courant.com/politics/hc-pol-stefanowski-still-campaigning-20190528-3ivzcnv7u5ftzmq5y2d4wgxefy-story.html
  38. ^ "Paul LePage says 'I am going to challenge Janet Mills' in 2022". Bangor Daily News. April 29, 2020. Retrieved April 29, 2020.
  39. ^ "Andrew Cuomo says he'll run for fourth term as New York governor". CBS News. May 28, 2019. Retrieved May 13, 2020.
  40. ^ Brennan, Chris; Terruso, Julia; McCrystal, Laura (November 8, 2019). "Did Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf just endorse Josh Shapiro for governor in 2022? 'That's my guy.'". Philly.com.
  41. ^ Brennan, Chris (December 27, 2018). "Democrats in Pa. 'row offices' on a collision course for 2022 election". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved January 23, 2020.
  42. ^ Brennan, Chris (December 9, 2019). "Everyone's already talking about Pennsylvania's big 2022 elections. Just don't ask the candidates". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved October 26, 2020. Fetterman is widely expected to run for Senate again...

External linksEdit