2022 United States Senate elections

The 2022 United States Senate elections will be held on November 8, 2022, with 34 of the 100 seats in the Senate being contested in regular elections, the winners of which will serve six-year terms in the United States Congress from January 3, 2023, to January 3, 2029. Senators are divided into three groups, or classes, whose terms are staggered so that a different class is elected every two years. Class 3 senators were last elected in 2016, and will be up for election again in 2022.

2022 United States Senate elections

← 2020 November 8, 2022 2024 →

34 of the 100 seats in the United States Senate
51 seats needed for a majority
  Mitch McConnell 2016 official photo (cropped).jpg Chuck Schumer official photo (cropped).jpg
Leader Mitch McConnell Chuck Schumer
Party Republican Democratic
Leader since January 3, 2007 January 3, 2017
Leader's seat Kentucky New York
Last election 50[a] 46[a][b]
Seats needed Increase 1[a][c] Increase 2[b]
Seats up 20 13

 
Party Independent
Current seats 2[b]
Seats up 0

2022 United States Senate election in Alabama2022 United States Senate election in Alaska2022 United States Senate election in Arizona2022 United States Senate election in Arkansas2022 United States Senate election in California2022 United States Senate election in Colorado2022 United States Senate election in Connecticut2022 United States Senate election in Florida2022 United States Senate election in Georgia2022 United States Senate election in Hawaii2022 United States Senate election in Idaho2022 United States Senate election in Illinois2022 United States Senate election in Indiana2022 United States Senate election in Iowa2022 United States Senate election in Kansas2022 United States Senate election in Kentucky2022 United States Senate election in Louisiana2022 United States Senate election in Maryland2022 United States Senate election in Missouri2022 United States Senate election in Nevada2022 United States Senate election in New Hampshire2022 United States Senate election in New York2022 United States Senate election in North Carolina2022 United States Senate election in North Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Ohio2022 United States Senate election in Oklahoma2022 United States Senate election in Oregon2022 United States Senate election in Pennsylvania2022 United States Senate election in South Carolina2022 United States Senate election in South Dakota2022 United States Senate election in Utah2022 United States Senate election in Vermont2022 United States Senate election in Washington2022 United States Senate election in Wisconsin2022 US Senate map.svg
About this image
Map of the incumbents:
     Democratic incumbent
     Republican incumbent      Retiring Republican
     Undetermined incumbent
     No election

Incumbent Majority Leader

TBD in 2020



All 34 Class 3 Senate seats are up for election in 2022; Class 3 currently consists of 12 Democrats and 22 Republicans. If vacancies occur in Class 1 or Class 2 Senate seats, that state might require a special election to take place during the 118th Congress, possibly concurrently with the other 2022 Senate elections.

Partisan compositionEdit

Parties Total
Democratic Republican Independent Unknown
Before these elections TBD TBD TBD 2 100
Not up TBD TBD TBD 0 66
Class 1 (20182024) 21 10 2 0 33
Class 2 (2020)→2026 TBD TBD TBD 0 33
Up 13 20 0 1 34
Class 3 (2016→2022) 13 20 0 1 34
Special: Class 1 & 2 0 0 0 1 1
General election
Incumbent retiring TBD TBD 0 TBD
Incumbent running TBD TBD 0 TBD

Change in compositionEdit

Each block represents one of the one hundred seats in the U.S. Senate. "D#" is a Democratic senator, "I#" is an Independent senator, and "R#" is a Republican senator. They are arranged so the parties are separated and a majority is clear by crossing the middle.

Before the electionsEdit

Each block indicates an incumbent senator's actions going into the election.

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
D40
Md.
Undeclared
D39
Ill.
Undeclared
D38
Hawaii
Undeclared
D37
Conn.
Undeclared
D36
Colo.
Undeclared
D35
Calif.
Undeclared
D34
Ariz.
Undeclared
D33 D32 D31
D41
Nev.
Undeclared
D42
N.H.
Undeclared
D43
N.Y.
Undeclared
D44
Ore.
Undeclared
D45
Vt.
Undeclared
D46
Wash.
Undeclared
I1 I2 TBD
in 2020
TBD
in 2020

Ga.
Undeclared
Majority →
R50
Wisc.
Undeclared
R41
Mo.
Undeclared
R42
N.C.
Retiring
R43
N.D.
Undeclared
R44
Ohio
Undeclared
R45
Okla.
Undeclared
R46
Pa.
Retiring
R47
S.C.
Undeclared
R48
S.D.
Undeclared
R49
Utah
Undeclared
R40
La.
Undeclared
R39
Ky.
Undeclared
R38
Kans.
Undeclared
R37
Iowa
Undeclared
R36
Ind.
Undeclared
R35
Idaho
Undeclared
R34
Fla.
Running
R33
Ark.
Running
R32
Alaska
Running
R31
Ala.
Undeclared
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10

After the electionsEdit

D1 D2 D3 D4 D5 D6 D7 D8 D9 D10
D20 D19 D18 D17 D16 D15 D14 D13 D12 D11
D21 D22 D23 D24 D25 D26 D27 D28 D29 D30
Ark.
TBD
Ariz.
TBD
Alaska
TBD
Ala.
TBD
TBD in 2020 I2 I1 D33 D32 D31
Calif.
TBD
Colo.
TBD
Conn.
TBD
Fla.
TBD
Ga.
TBD
Hawaii
TBD
Idaho
TBD
Ill.
TBD
Ind.
TBD
Iowa
TBD
Majority →
Kans.
TBD
N.D.
TBD
N.C.
TBD
N.Y.
TBD
N.H.
TBD
Nev.
TBD
Mo.
TBD
Md.
TBD
La.
TBD
Ky.
TBD
Ohio
TBD
Okla.
TBD
Ore.
TBD
Pa.
TBD
S.C.
TBD
S.D.
TBD
Utah
TBD
Vt.
TBD
Wash.
TBD
Wisc.
TBD
R21 R22 R23 R24 R25 R26 R27 R28 R29 R30
R20 R19 R18 R17 R16 R15 R14 R13 R12 R11
R1 R2 R3 R4 R5 R6 R7 R8 R9 R10
Key:
D# Democratic
R# Republican
I# Independent, caucusing with Democrats

Potentially competitive racesEdit

Potentially competitive Republican-held seats up for election in 2022 include Florida, Iowa, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin. Potentially competitive Democratic-held seats up for election in 2022 include Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, and New Hampshire.[1] The Senate seat in Georgia will likely be competitive in 2022 regardless of which party holds the seat. It is believed that Arizona, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin will be the most competitive races.[citation needed]

Race summaryEdit

State
(linked to
summaries below)
Incumbent Results Candidates
Senator Party Electoral history Last race
Alabama Richard Shelby Republican 1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
64.0% R Incumbent's intent unknown. Announcement expected in January.[2]
  • TBD
Alaska Lisa Murkowski Republican 2002 (Appointed)
2004
2010
2016
44.4% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Arizona Mark Kelly Democratic 2020 (Special) 51.2% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Arkansas John Boozman Republican 2010
2016
59.8% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • Dan Whitfield (Independent)
California TBD Democratic TBD 61.6% D[d] Incumbent Kamala Harris was elected U.S. Vice President on November 7, 2020.[3]
Harris will resign to become Vice President and President of the Senate.
Colorado Michael Bennet Democratic 2009 (Appointed)
2010
2016
50.0% D Incumbent running.
Connecticut Richard Blumenthal Democratic 2010
2016
63.2% D Incumbent running. Richard Blumenthal (Democratic)[6]

Robert Hyde (Republican)

Florida Marco Rubio Republican 2010
2016
52.0% R Incumbent running. Marco Rubio (Republican)[7]
Georgia TBD TBD 2020 (Special) TBD Incumbent to be determined in the 2020 special election.
  • TBD
Hawaii Brian Schatz Democratic 2012 (Appointed)
2014 (Special)
2016
73.6% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Idaho Mike Crapo Republican 1998
2004
2010
2016
66.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Illinois Tammy Duckworth Democratic 2016 54.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Indiana Todd Young Republican 2016 52.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Iowa Chuck Grassley Republican 1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
60.1% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Kansas Jerry Moran Republican 2010
2016
62.2% R Incumbent running
Kentucky Rand Paul Republican 2010
2016
57.3% R Incumbent's intent unknown.[9]
  • TBD
Louisiana John Neely Kennedy Republican 2016 60.6% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Maryland Chris Van Hollen Democratic 2016 60.9% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Missouri Roy Blunt Republican 2010
2016
49.2% R Incumbent running.
Nevada Catherine Cortez Masto Democratic 2016 47.1% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
New Hampshire Maggie Hassan Democratic 2016 48.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
New York Chuck Schumer Democratic 1998
2004
2010
2016
70.6% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • Khaled Salem (Democratic)[11]
North Carolina Richard Burr Republican 2004
2010
2016
51.1% R Incumbent retiring.[12]
  • TBD
North Dakota John Hoeven Republican 2010
2016
78.5% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Ohio Rob Portman Republican 2010
2016
58.0% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • Mark Pukita (Republican)[13]
Oklahoma James Lankford Republican 2014 (Special)
2016
67.7% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Oregon Ron Wyden Democratic 1996 (Special)
1998
2004
2010
2016
56.6% D Incumbent's intent unknown. Jo Rae Perkins (Republican)[14]
Pennsylvania Pat Toomey Republican 2010
2016
48.8% R Incumbent retiring.[15]
  • TBD
South Carolina Tim Scott Republican 2013 (Appointed)
2014 (Special)
2016
60.6% R Incumbent running.[16]
South Dakota John Thune Republican 2004
2010
2016
71.8% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Utah Mike Lee Republican 2010
2016
68.2% R Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Vermont Patrick Leahy Democratic 1974
1980
1986
1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
61.3% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Washington Patty Murray Democratic 1992
1998
2004
2010
2016
59.0% D Incumbent's intent unknown.
  • TBD
Wisconsin Ron Johnson Republican 2010
2016
50.2% R Incumbent's intent unknown.[17]

AlabamaEdit

Republican Richard Shelby was re-elected in 2016 to a sixth term.

AlaskaEdit

Three-term Republican Lisa Murkowski was re-elected in 2016. Former governor and vice presidential nominee Sarah Palin is considering a primary challenge to Murkowski.[19]

ArizonaEdit

Democratic Senator-elect Mark Kelly was elected in a 2020 special election.

Six-term senator and 2008 Republican presidential nominee John McCain was re-elected to this seat in 2016. However, he died on August 25, 2018, and former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl was appointed to replace him. Kyl resigned at the end of 2018 and was succeeded by outgoing U.S. Representative Martha McSally, who lost the 2020 special election to complete the term.

Incumbent Arizona governor Doug Ducey is a potential Republican candidate.

ArkansasEdit

Two-term Republican John Boozman was re-elected in 2016. Independent Dan Whitfield, who attempted to run in 2020 but failed to meet the ballot requirements, is running.[20]

CaliforniaEdit

One-term Democrat Kamala Harris was elected in 2016. As she is the Vice President-elect of the United States, she will need to resign her Senate seat before assuming the vice presidency on January 20, 2021. Governor Gavin Newsom is expected to appoint her successor after her resignation.

ColoradoEdit

Two-term Democrat Michael Bennet was re-elected in 2016.

ConnecticutEdit

Democrat Richard Blumenthal was first elected to this seat in 2010 with 55.2% over Republican Linda McMahon. He was then re-elected in 2016 with 63.2% over Republican Dan Carter.[21] Republican Robert F. Hyde is running.[22][23]

FloridaEdit

Two-term Republican Marco Rubio was re-elected in 2016. He announced on November 9, 2020, via Facebook, that he would be running for re-election.[24]

Possible Democratic candidates include U.S. Representative Val Demings,[25][26][27] State Representative Anna Eskamani,[26][28] Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Nikki Fried,[29] former U.S. Representative Gwen Graham,[29] U.S. Representative Stephanie Murphy,[26] and State Senator Jason Pizzo.[26]

Former U.S. Representative David Jolly, who was previously a Republican but is now independent, is considering running.[30]

GeorgiaEdit

Three-term Republican Johnny Isakson was re-elected in 2016. However, Isakson resigned his seat because of ongoing health concerns on December 31, 2019. Under Georgia law, Brian Kemp appointed Kelly Loeffler to hold Isakson's seat until a special runoff election is held in 2021.[31] The winner of that election will be the incumbent in the regular 2022 election.

Potential Democratic candidates include former Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed.[32]

HawaiiEdit

One-term Democrat Brian Schatz was appointed to the Senate in 2012 following the death of incumbent Daniel Inouye. He won a special election to finish Inouye's term in 2014 and won his first full term in 2016.

IdahoEdit

Four-term Republican Mike Crapo was re-elected in 2016.

IllinoisEdit

One-term Democrat Tammy Duckworth was elected in 2016.

IndianaEdit

One-term Republican Todd Young was elected in 2016.

Possible Democratic candidates include former Mayor of South Bend and 2020 presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg, provided that he is not in the Biden Cabinet.[33]

IowaEdit

Seven-term Republican Chuck Grassley was re-elected in 2016. When asked by the Iowa Capital Dispatch in February 2020 if he would be running for re-election and said:

You'll have to ask me a year and a half from now. Now if you'd asked me that six years ago, I'd have said I'm running for re-election. But now that I'm 86, I better make sure I can see myself to be 95 years old... Now the one thing I want to make sure of is, that I don't become a Senator Byrd, where, the last two years on office, I have to have a nurse with me. Or when Thurmond left office at 100 years and three months, but the last couple of years, he needed a lot of help.

He also said that he would decide whether to run again "eight months to a year before the 2022 election".[34]

Potential Democratic candidates include U.S. Representatives Cindy Axne and Abby Finkenauer, retired Admiral and U.S. Senator Ted Kennedy's former aide Michael T. Franken, attorney Kimberly Graham, 2020 US Senate candidate Theresa Greenfield, businessman and teacher Eddie Mauro, Iowa State Auditor Rob Sand, and veteran Cal Woods.[35]

KansasEdit

Two-term Republican Jerry Moran was re-elected in 2016. He has announced that he will be seeking re-election[36]

KentuckyEdit

Two-term Republican Rand Paul was re-elected in 2016.

LouisianaEdit

One-term Republican John Neely Kennedy was elected in 2016.

MarylandEdit

One-term Democrat Chris Van Hollen was elected in 2016.

MissouriEdit

Two-term Republican Roy Blunt was re-elected in 2016. He is seeking re-election.[37]

Former Governor of Missouri Eric Greitens may run in the Republican primary.[38]

NevadaEdit

One-term Democrat Catherine Cortez Masto was elected in 2016.

Former Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval, Assemblywoman Jill Tolles, and former Attorney General Adam Laxalt may run against Cortez Masto.[citation needed]

New HampshireEdit

One-term Democrat Maggie Hassan was elected in 2016.

Retired U.S. Army general Don Bolduc has declared his candidacy as a Republican, having previously run in the 2020 Republican primary in New Hampshire.[39][40]

Former Senator Kelly Ayotte,[41] and Governor Chris Sununu,[42] have also been speculated to be potential Republican candidates.

New YorkEdit

Four-term Democrat Chuck Schumer was re-elected in 2016. Sam Seder, the host of The Majority Report with Sam Seder, has expressed interest in challenging Schumer for the Democratic nomination. Human rights activist Khaled Salem is challenging Schumer in the primary.[11]

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Democratic Congresswoman for New York's 14th congressional district, who successfully defeated long time incumbent Democrat Joe Crowley in an upset 2018 primary campaign, has been floated as a possible primary challenger to Schumer.[43]

North CarolinaEdit

Three-term Republican Richard Burr was re-elected in 2016. Burr has pledged to retire in 2022.[44] Former governor Pat McCrory and 2020 primary challenger to Thom Tillis, Garland Tucker, are potential Republican candidates.[45]

Incumbent North Carolina Governor Roy Cooper is a potential Democratic candidate.

North DakotaEdit

Two-term Republican John Hoeven was re-elected in 2016.

OhioEdit

Two-term Republican Rob Portman was re-elected in 2016. Portman has begun fundraising, but has not declared his candidacy.[46] IT executive Mark Pukita is running in the Republican primary with the intention of unseating Portman.[13] Should Portman decide to retire, Lieutenant Governor Jon Husted is a potential Republican candidate.[47]

Potential Democratic candidates include Cincinnati Mayor John Cranley,[48] Columbus City Attorney Zach Klein,[49] Ohio Democratic Party Chairman David Pepper, U.S. Representative and 2020 presidential candidate Tim Ryan,[50][48] Franklin County Treasurer Cheryl Brooks Sullivan, Ohio House Minority Leader Emilia Sykes,[51] and Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley.[48]

OklahomaEdit

One-term Republican senator James Lankford won the 2014 special election to serve the remainder of former senator Tom Coburn's term, and Lankford won election to his first full term in 2016.

OregonEdit

Four-term Democrat Ron Wyden was re-elected in 2016.

PennsylvaniaEdit

Two-term Republican Pat Toomey was re-elected in 2016. On October 5, 2020, Toomey announced that he will retire at the end of his term.[52]

Potential Democratic candidates include Montgomery County Commissioner Valerie Arkoosh,[52] U.S. Representative Brendan Boyle,[52] Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman,[53] U.S. Representative Chrissy Houlahan,[52] State Representative Malcolm Kenyatta,[52] U.S. Representative Conor Lamb,[54] Toomey's 2010 opponent, Joe Sestak,[55] and State Treasurer Joe Torsella.[52] It is also speculated incumbent governor Tom Wolf will run for the Senate seat since his term as governor is ending in 2023 due to term limits.

Potential Republican candidates include State Senator Camera Bartolotta,[52] 2018 Senate candidate Jeff Bartos,[52] former U.S. Representative Ryan Costello,[52] 2018 gubernatorial candidate Paul Mango,[52] U.S. Attorney William McSwain,[52] Chester County Commissioner Michelle H. Kichline, state Representative Martina White, and current U.S. Representatives Dan Meuser,[52] Guy Reschenthaler,[52] Lloyd Smucker,[52] and Glenn Thompson.[52]

South CarolinaEdit

One-term Republican Tim Scott was appointed in 2013, and won election to his first full term in 2016.

South DakotaEdit

Three-term Republican John Thune was re-elected in 2016.

UtahEdit

Two-term Republican Mike Lee was re-elected in 2016.

VermontEdit

The most senior senator, eight-term Democrat Patrick Leahy was re-elected in 2016. Vermont is the only State that has never sent a woman to Congress.[56][57]

Potential Republican candidates include Governor Phil Scott, and State House Minority Leader Patricia McCoy may challenge the Democratic nominee.[citation needed]

Should Leahy retire, potential Democratic candidates include:

WashingtonEdit

Five-term Democrat Patty Murray was re-elected in 2016.

WisconsinEdit

Two-term Republican Ron Johnson was re-elected in 2016. Johnson had pledged to retire in 2022,[63] but in 2019, he said he did not know if he would in fact seek a third term or not and would not rule anything out.[17]

Kenosha County sheriff David Beth (R) has expressed an interest in running for the Senate.[64] Former Governor Scott Walker has said that he will not run.[65]

Potential Democratic candidates include Lieutenant Governor Mandela Barnes, U.S. Representative Mark Pocan, and Attorney General of Wisconsin Josh Kaul.[citation needed]

On October 23, 2020, Tom Nelson, current County Executive of Outagamie filed a statement of candidacy as a Democrat.[18]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c The two seats in Georgia of the 2020 elections are still undetermined. They will both be decided on a January 5, 2021 runoff election.
  2. ^ a b c The two independent senators, Bernie Sanders and Angus King, have caucused with the Democratic Party since joining the Senate.
  3. ^ If the Republicans lose both of their seats in Georgia, Democrats will have control of the Senate since incoming President of the Senate (Vice President-elect) Kamala Harris (D) will have the power to break any tie in the Senate, with the chamber's composition de facto being 51-50 for the Democrats.
  4. ^ Democrat Kamala Harris won in 2016 against another Democrat.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Kondik, Kyle (October 5, 2017). "The Republican Senate Edge". Sabato's Crystal Ball. Archived from the original on April 13, 2018. Retrieved April 11, 2018.
  2. ^ "Alabama zeroes in on Richard Shelby's future". The Hill. November 19, 2020. Retrieved November 20, 2020.
  3. ^ "Kamala Harris Makes History as First Woman and Woman of Color as Vice President". New York Times. November 7, 2020.
  4. ^ "Former Inglewood councilman gears up for 2022 Senate race". 2UrbanGirls. November 9, 2020. Retrieved November 14, 2020.
  5. ^ McFall, Caitlin (November 3, 2020). "Colorado Sen. Michael Bennet not interested in being Biden's education secretary". Fox News. Retrieved November 12, 2020.
  6. ^ Munson, Emilie (November 4, 2020). "A campaign begins: Blumenthal will seek re-election in 2022". Connecticut Post. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  7. ^ Manjarres, Javier (November 9, 2020). "Sen. Marco Rubio will run for reelection in 2022". The Floridian. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  8. ^ "Moran to seek re-election in 2022". PR Atchsison Globe Now. November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  9. ^ "RAND PAUL SIGNS U.S. TERM LIMITS PLEDGE". U.S. Term Limits. September 28, 2015. Retrieved November 4, 2020.
  10. ^ Smith, Jeff (November 17, 2020). "2020 was a bloodbath for Missouri Democrats. Will 2022 be any better". KTTN. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  11. ^ a b Salem, Khaled (September 22, 2020). "Khaled Salem Announces Candidacy for U.S. Senate in New York State". PR Newswire. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  12. ^ Colin Campbell (July 20, 2016). "US Sen. Richard Burr says 2016 will be his last run for elected office". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on September 13, 2018. Retrieved September 27, 2018.
  13. ^ a b Ghose, Carrie (October 31, 2019). "Dublin IT firm exec selling most of interest, launching campaign to unseat GOP Sen. Rob Portman in 2022 primary". Columbus Business First. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  14. ^ jim.day@lee.net, JAMES DAY. "Perkins plans another run for Senate". Corvallis Gazette Times. Retrieved November 18, 2020.
  15. ^ Tamari, Jonathan; Bender, William (October 4, 2020). "Sen. Pat Toomey won't run for reelection or for Pennsylvania governor, sources say". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved October 4, 2020.
  16. ^ a b Rachel Frazin (August 9, 2019). "GOP Sen. Tim Scott says if he runs in 2022 it will be his last race". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 9, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2019 – via MSN.
  17. ^ a b "Sen. Ron Johnson not ruling out 2022 run for governor". Green Bay, Wisconsin: WBAY-TV. Associated Press. May 18, 2019. Archived from the original on May 18, 2019. Retrieved May 18, 2019.
  18. ^ a b Gallup, Larry (October 22, 2020). "Outagamie County Executive Tom Nelson files statement of candidacy for 2022 Senate race". Appleton Post-Crescent.
  19. ^ Joel Shannon (October 5, 2018). "'I can see 2022 from my house': Palin taunts Murkowski ahead of Kavanaugh vote". USA Today. Archived from the original on October 5, 2018. Retrieved October 6, 2018.
  20. ^ @DanWhitCongress (October 19, 2020). "After much deliberation with my wife, donors, and supporters, I have decided to run against @JohnBoozman for United States Senate in 2022!" (Tweet). Retrieved November 8, 2020 – via Twitter.
  21. ^ "GOP's Dan Carter announces for U.S. Senate nomination". The Connecticut Mirror. April 4, 2016.
  22. ^ Munson, Emilie (December 1, 2019). "CT congressional candidate in Trump's inner circle - or is he?". Connecticut Post. Archived from the original on January 15, 2020.
  23. ^ Sommer, Will; Swan, Betsy (January 25, 2020). "Meet the Trump Donor Who Allegedly Stalked America's Ambassador in Ukraine". The Daily Beast.
  24. ^ Manjarres, Javier (November 9, 2020). "Sen. Marco Rubio will run for reelection in 2022". The Floridian. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  25. ^ Ruth, Daniel (February 7, 2020). "Imagine Val Demings vs. Marco Rubio in 2022". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  26. ^ a b c d Contorno, Steve (July 19, 2020). "As Ron DeSantis slips in Florida polls, Democratic challengers for governor are starting to emerge". Tampa Bay Times. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  27. ^ DJ 6 Minutes (June 10, 2020). "If Passed Over By Biden, Val Demings Could Challenge Republican Rubio In Florida Senate Race In 2022". WMBT. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  28. ^ Powers, Scott (July 29, 2019). "Anna Eskamani registers higher-office campaign websites—just in case". Archived from the original on March 10, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  29. ^ a b Burlew, Jeff (November 20, 2018). "Gwen Graham could be statewide contender again, in four long years". Tallahassee Democrat. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  30. ^ "Former U.S. Rep. David Jolly hints at possible run for Governor or U.S. Senate". Florida Politics. July 27, 2020.
  31. ^ Carney, Jordain (August 28, 2019). "GOP Sen. Johnny Isakson to resign at end of year". The Hill. Archived from the original on August 28, 2019. Retrieved August 28, 2019.
  32. ^ Bluestein, Greg (May 23, 2016). "Kasim Reed: 'I think I've got another campaign in me'". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  33. ^ Cillizza, Chris. "What's Pete Buttigieg going to do next?". CNN. Archived from the original on June 3, 2020. Retrieved May 31, 2020.
  34. ^ Kinney, Patrick (February 19, 2020). "Grassley not yet ready to call it a career". Iowa Capital Dispatch. Archived from the original on March 6, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  35. ^ Belin, Laura (February 20, 2020). "Chuck Grassley says grandson's "never expressed" interest in U.S. Senate bid". Bleeding Heartland. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  36. ^ "Moran to seek re-election in 2022". PR Atchsison Globe Now. November 16, 2020. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  37. ^ Smith, Jeff (November 17, 2020). "2020 was a bloodbath for Missouri Democrats. Will 2022 be any better". KTTN. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
  38. ^ Willeke, Becky (June 10, 2020). "Former Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens may be looking at running for office". KTVI. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  39. ^ "STATEMENT OF CANDIDACY - FILING FEC-1471866". fec.gov. November 9, 2020. Retrieved November 9, 2020.
  40. ^ "Gen. Don Bolduc wastes no time announcing 2022 US Senate candidacy to take on Hassan". November 9, 2020. Retrieved November 17, 2020.
  41. ^ Steinhauser, Pal (December 29, 2019). "Potential Challengers Mull Run Against Sen. Shaheen". Valley News. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  42. ^ "NH Primary Source: Did Sununu just announce a 2022 US Senate run against Hassan? No, but …". Archived from the original on November 7, 2020. Retrieved November 7, 2020.,
  43. ^ Allen, Mike (June 10, 2019). "Democrats buzz about AOC primarying Chuck Schumer". Axios. Retrieved November 11, 2020.
  44. ^ Campbell, Colin (July 20, 2016). "US Sen. Richard Burr says 2016 will be his last run for elected office". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on November 11, 2016. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  45. ^ Morrill, Jim (January 2, 2019). "Pat McCrory rules out 9th District run – but he's considering two other campaigns". The Charlotte Observer. Archived from the original on January 3, 2019. Retrieved January 2, 2019.
  46. ^ "GOP's Portman raises another $1M for 2022 reelection bid". Associated Press. Retrieved May 13, 2019.
  47. ^ Suddes, Thomas. "Column: As 2020 elections end Nov. 3, Ohio politicking will begin for 2022". Columbus Dispatch. Retrieved January 5, 2020.
  48. ^ a b c Larkin, Brett (August 8, 2020). "'Rule of 3' does not bode well for Mike DeWine". Cleveland.com. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  49. ^ Rouhan, Rick (August 18, 2020). "Ohio Democrats eyeing 2022 statewide runs must find new ways to network without convention". The Times-Gazette. Retrieved October 3, 2020.
  50. ^ Malone, Clare. "How Tim Ryan Could Win The 2020 Democratic Nomination". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved April 4, 2019.
  51. ^ @EmiliaSykesOH (September 20, 2020). "Hey everyone. Listen. We already knew this. Republicans are not going to do the right thing..." (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  52. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o Tamari, Jonathan; Seidman, Andrew; Walsh, Sean Collins; Brennan, Chris (October 5, 2020). "Pat Toomey just made the 2022 elections in Pennsylvania a total free-for-all". The Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on October 10, 2020.
  53. ^ Brennan, Chris (December 9, 2019). "Everyone's already talking about Pennsylvaniafs big 2022 elections. Just don't ask the candidates". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved August 24, 2020. Fetterman is widely expected to run for Senate again...
  54. ^ James Carville & Al Hunt (September 3, 2020). "Conor Lamb on Biden's Everyman Appeal and Rashawn Ray on the Aftershock of Kenosha". 2020 Politics War Room. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  55. ^ Collins, Sean (December 1, 2019). "Joe Sestak, former congressman and admiral, ends his bid for president". Vox. Archived from the original on March 3, 2020. Retrieved April 17, 2020.
  56. ^ Corwin, Emily (February 20, 2020). "Why Has Vermont Never Sent A Woman To Congress?". www.vpr.org. Vermont Public Radio.
  57. ^ Levy, Adam (March 21, 2018). "Vermont on track to be the only state that has never sent a woman to Congress". CNN.
  58. ^ a b c d Heintz, Paul (November 18, 2020). "If Sanders Joined Biden's Cabinet, Who Would Succeed Him in the Senate?". Seven Days.
  59. ^ O'Connor, Kevin (November 3, 2020). "Senate leader Becca Balint's new signs hint at future statewide run". VTDigger.
  60. ^ Sukiennik, Greg (November 23, 2020). "Balint, women leaders, Brock make history as Senate leadership shifts". Brattleboro Reformer.
  61. ^ Davis, Eric (October 24, 2019). "Vermont elections may lack drama". Addison County Independent. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  62. ^ Xander Landen & Kit Norton (October 29, 2019). "Democrats poll Zuckerman and Donovan for governor as Holcombe presses ahead". VTDigger. Retrieved October 25, 2020.
  63. ^ Carney, Jordain (October 10, 2016). "Ron Johnson pledges to retire after serving one more Senate term". The Hill. Archived from the original on October 11, 2016. Retrieved November 10, 2016.
  64. ^ Schenek, Dan (March 17, 2017). "Kenosha County Sheriff David Beth says he may run for Ron Johnson's U.S. Senate seat in 5 years". Radio 620 WTMJ. Archived from the original on March 22, 2017. Retrieved March 21, 2017.
  65. ^ Kelly Meyerhofer (July 18, 2019). "Scott Walker takes new job, says he won't run for office in 2022". Wisconsin State Journal. Archived from the original on July 16, 2019. Retrieved August 9, 2019.