The 2019 UCI Road World Championships was the 92nd edition of the UCI Road World Championships, the annual world championships for road bicycle racing. It took place between 22 and 29 September 2019 in the historic county of Yorkshire, United Kingdom, the fourth to be held in the United Kingdom. The championships are traditionally hosted by a single town or city but, while each event in 2019 finished in the North Yorkshire town of Harrogate, the whole historic county of Yorkshire was the official host. Heavy rainfall caused some of the events to be re-routed and delayed.

2019 UCI Road World Championships
2019 UCI Road World Championships.png
Harrogate is located in Yorkshire and the Humber
Harrogate
Harrogate
Harrogate is located in the United Kingdom
Harrogate
Harrogate
VenueHarrogate, United Kingdom
Date(s) (2019-09-22 - 2019-09-29)22–29 September 2019
Coordinates53°59′30″N 1°32′15″W / 53.99167°N 1.53750°W / 53.99167; -1.53750
Events11
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Men and women were split into the categories of elite, under-23 (only men) and junior, competing individually in the two traditional road race and time trial disciplines of road bicycle racing. The 2019 championships saw the introduction of the mixed team relay, a team time trial which was raced together by the elite men and women. Mads Pedersen of Denmark won the men's elite road race and Annemiek van Vleuten of the Netherlands won the women's elite road race. The elite time trial titles were taken by Australian Rohan Dennis and American Chloé Dygert Owen.

Race locationsEdit

 
Starting point for the junior women's and under-23 men's road races in Doncaster[1]

In July 2017, it was announced that Harrogate would host two circuit races and the other races were to start in locations across the historic county of Yorkshire, including Beverley, Doncaster, Leeds, Northallerton, Ripon and York.[2]

At the 2018 UCI Road World Championships in September 2018, further details for the championships were announced.[3] Harrogate would host the finishes for all eleven races during the eight days of racing,[4] including the new-for-2019 mixed team time trial relay; three of these races will be contested entirely within a circuit of 14 kilometres (8.7 miles) in and around Harrogate. Ripon was announced to hold the start of two time trials, while the men's time trial will start in Northallerton.[5] For the road races, Richmond was announced as the start location for the men's junior road race, while Doncaster would hold the start for the two remaining age-group races.[5] The elite races were announced to be starting in Bradford (women) and Leeds (men) respectively.[3]

The men's and women's elite road races followed separate routes before entering a 14 km (9 mi) circuit in and around the town of Harrogate. The men's elite road race integrated the route from stage one of the 2014 Tour de France for the first 185 kilometres (115 miles) before completing seven laps of the final circuit, for a total distance of 284.5 kilometres (176.8 miles).[6] However, heavy rainfall necessitated last minute changes to the route of the men's elite road race, shortening the route to 260.7 kilometres (162.0 miles).[7]

ScheduleEdit

All times listed below were for the local time – British Summer Time or UTC+01:00.

Date Timings Event Location
(start)
Location
(finish)
Distance Laps[a]
Mixed team relay
22 September 13:10 15:37 Mixed relay Harrogate 27.6 km (17.1 mi)[9] 2
Individual time trial events
23 September 10:10 11:42 Junior women Harrogate 13.7 km (8.5 mi)[10] 1
13:10 16:41 Junior men 27.6 km (17.1 mi)[11] 2
24 September 10:10 12:29 Under-23 men Ripon Harrogate 30.3 km (18.8 mi)[12][13] 1
14:40 16:48 Elite women
25 September 13:10 15:48 Elite men Northallerton 54 km (34 mi)[14] N/A
Road race events
26 September 12:10 15:48 Junior men Richmond Harrogate 148.1 km (92.0 mi)[15] 3
27 September 08:40 11:19 Junior women Doncaster 86 km (53 mi)[16] N/A
14:10 19:06 Under-23 men 171.6 km (106.6 mi)[17] 2
28 September 11:40 15:47 Elite women Bradford 149.4 km (92.8 mi)[18] 3
29 September 09:10 15:35 Elite men Leeds 260.7 km (162.0 mi)[b] 9

Race summariesEdit

Elite men's road raceEdit

 
The start of the men's road race in Leeds

Mads Pedersen surprised in the men's road race by becoming the first Danish world champion in the event after winning the sprint in a three-man breakaway.[23] Italy's Matteo Trentin started the sprint but took silver while Stefan Küng of Switzerland took bronze.[24] One of the favourites, Mathieu van der Poel of the Netherlands, had also been in the breakaway but could not follow it on the last lap and ended over ten minutes behind. This left four men where Italy's Gianni Moscon later lost contact; he finished in fourth place but was unable to help his teammate Trentin. Three-time champion Peter Sagan of Slovakia made a late breakaway from a larger chase group but could not catch the leaders and came fifth, followed by Michael Valgren of Denmark.[25]

Elite women's road raceEdit

Dutch cyclist Annemiek van Vleuten won the race, after a solo breakaway for more than 100 km (62 mi). Defending champion Anna van der Breggen, also of the Netherlands, finished as runner-up, with Australian cyclist Amanda Spratt finishing in third.[26][27]

Elite time trialsEdit

The men's time trial was 54 km (34 mi). Defending champion Rohan Dennis of Australia won by more than a minute. The silver went to the 19-year old Belgian Remco Evenepoel who skipped the under-23 event after winning both the road race and time trial for juniors in 2018. Italy's Filippo Ganna rounded out the podium.[28]

The women's time trial was 30.3 km (18.8 mi). The American Chloé Dygert Owen won by 1 minute 32 seconds, the largest margin ever in a world championship time trial. Anna van der Breggen took silver. Two-time defending champion Annemiek van Vleuten, had to settle with bronze. Four days later she won the road race after riding solo for more than three times as long.[29]

The new mixed team time trial relay was 27.6 km (17.1 mi) in total, one lap for three men and one for three women. The inaugural event was won by one of the favourites, the Dutch team, with the female trio of Lucinda Brand, Riejanne Markus, Amy Pieters, and the male triumvirate Koen Bouwman, Bauke Mollema and Jos van Emden. Germany and the host Great Britain took silver and bronze, 23 seconds and 51 seconds behind.[30]

Under-23 eventsEdit

 
The start of the men's under-23 road race in Doncaster

As usual, there were only under-23 events for men. In the road race, Nils Eekhoff of the Netherlands won the sprint in a seven-man group but was later disqualified for drafting behind his team car for too long after a crash. The gold then went to Italy's Samuele Battistella. Stefan Bissegger of Switzerland was elevated to silver and Tom Pidcock got into the podium with a bronze for the British hosts.[31]

The Danish favourite Mikkel Bjerg won his third consecutive gold in the under-23 time trial. The Americans Ian Garrison and Brandon McNulty took silver and bronze one second apart, but 27 seconds behind Bjerg who started as the last rider.[32]

Junior eventsEdit

Both junior road races were won by Americans. Quinn Simmons finished solo in the men's race[33] while Megan Jastrab won a sprint for women.[34] The victories contributed to the United States winning the most golds in the 2019 championships, three in total.

Antonio Tiberi of Italy won the junior time trial for men by 8 seconds.[35] Russia's Aigul Gareeva won for women by four seconds.[36]

Events summaryEdit

Elite eventsEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's Events
Men's road race[21]
details
  Mads Pedersen (DEN) 6h 27' 28"   Matteo Trentin (ITA) + 0"   Stefan Küng (SUI) + 2"
Men's time trial[14]
details
  Rohan Dennis (AUS) 1h 05' 05.35"   Remco Evenepoel (BEL) + 1' 08.93"   Filippo Ganna (ITA) + 1' 55.00"
Women's Events
Women's road race[37]
details
  Annemiek van Vleuten (NED) 4h 06' 05"   Anna van der Breggen (NED) + 2' 15"   Amanda Spratt (AUS) + 2' 28"
Women's time trial[38]
details
  Chloé Dygert Owen (USA) 42' 11.57"   Anna van der Breggen (NED) + 1' 32.35"   Annemiek van Vleuten (NED) + 1' 52.66"
Mixed Event
Mixed relay[9]
details
  Netherlands (NED) 38' 27.60"   Germany (GER) + 22.75"   Great Britain (GBR) + 51.27"

Under-23 eventsEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's Under-23 Events
Men's under-23 road race[17]
details
  Samuele Battistella (ITA) 3h 53' 52"   Stefan Bissegger (SUI) + 0"   Tom Pidcock (GBR) + 0"
Men's under-23 time trial[39]
details
  Mikkel Bjerg (DEN) 40' 20.42"   Ian Garrison (USA) + 26.45"   Brandon McNulty (USA) + 27.69"

Junior eventsEdit

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Men's Juniors Events
Men's junior road race[40]
details
  Quinn Simmons (USA) 3h 38' 04"   Alessio Martinelli (ITA) + 56"   Magnus Sheffield (USA) + 1' 33"
Men's junior time trial[41]
details
  Antonio Tiberi (ITA) 38' 28.25"   Enzo Leijnse (NED) + 7.79"   Marco Brenner (GER) + 12.62"
Women's Juniors Events
Women's junior road race[42]
details
  Megan Jastrab (USA) 2h 08' 00"   Julie de Wilde (BEL) + 0"   Lieke Nooijen (NED) + 0"
Women's junior time trial[43]
details
  Aigul Gareeva (RUS) 22' 16.23"   Shirin van Anrooij (NED) + 3.61"   Elynor Bäckstedt (GBR) + 10.93"

Medal tableEdit

  *   Host nation (Great Britain)

RankNationGoldSilverBronzeTotal
1  United States (USA)3126
2  Netherlands (NED)2428
3  Italy (ITA)2215
4  Denmark (DEN)2002
5  Australia (AUS)1012
6  Russia (RUS)1001
7  Belgium (BEL)0202
8  Germany (GER)0112
   Switzerland (SUI)0112
10  Great Britain (GBR)*0033
Totals (10 nations)11111133

LegacyEdit

The legacy of the Worlds event has been reported with £15 million worth of funding to go towards the construction of 27 off-road racing venues around the country, "to ensure that every part of Britain has close access to a closed road circuit, velodrome, BMX track or mountain bike trail".[44]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Denotes the number of laps completed of the 14 km (8.7 mi) circuit in Harrogate.[8]
  2. ^ The race was initially scheduled to be contested over 280 km (170 mi) including seven laps of the Harrogate finish circuit.[19] Due to flooding on the course,[20] the race was reduced to 260.7 km (162.0 mi),[21] although two additional laps of the finish circuit were added to the itinerary.[22]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Doncaster". Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  2. ^ "Yorkshire host towns revealed for 2019 UCI Road World Championships". British Cycling. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  3. ^ a b Shrubsall, James (26 September 2018). "Yorkshire UCI Road World Championships 2019 routes and schedule revealed". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  4. ^ "2019 Road World Championships: Yorkshire to host first team time trial mixed relay". BBC Sport. BBC. 26 September 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  5. ^ a b Westby, Nick (26 September 2018). "Yorkshire 2019: Tour de France revisited in race for rainbow jersey". The Yorkshire Post. Yorkshire Post Newspapers. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  6. ^ Long, Jonny (29 September 2019). "Yorkshire Road World Championships 2019: Elite men's road race start list". Cycling Weekly. TI Media. Retrieved 4 October 2019.
  7. ^ Smith, Peter. "Bad weather forces changes to elite men's race at Yorkshire's UCI Road World Championships". The Yorkshire Post. Yorkshire Post Newspapers. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  8. ^ "Full routes and race schedule for Yorkshire 2019". Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. 26 September 2018. Retrieved 28 September 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Final Results / Résultat final: Team Time Trial Mixed Relay" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 22 September 2019. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  10. ^ "Timings: Women Junior Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  11. ^ "Timings: Men Junior Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  12. ^ "Timings: Men U23 Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  13. ^ "Timings: Women Elite Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  14. ^ a b "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Elite Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 25 September 2019. Retrieved 25 September 2019.
  15. ^ "Timings: Men Junior Road Race" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  16. ^ "Timings: Women Junior Road Race" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  17. ^ a b "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Under 23 Road Race" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  18. ^ "Timings: Women Elite Road Race" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  19. ^ "Timings: Men Elite Road Race" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 22 September 2019.
  20. ^ Howes, Nick (29 September 2019). "Men Elite Road Race re-routed". Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  21. ^ a b "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Elite Road Race / Course en ligne Hommes Elite" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 29 September 2019. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  22. ^ "Hommes Elite – Course en ligne – samedi 29 septembre 2019 / Men Elite Road Race – Sunday 29 September 2019" (PDF). Yorkshire 2019 UCI Road World Championships. Yorkshire 2019 Limited. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  23. ^ "World Championships: Mads Pedersen wins elite men's rainbow jersey". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 29 September 2019. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  24. ^ Skelton, Jack (29 September 2019). "Road World Championship: Denmark's Mads Pedersen claims shock elite men's road race title". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  25. ^ "World Championships: Mads Pedersen wins elite men's rainbow jersey". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. 29 September 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  26. ^ Skelton, Jack (28 September 2019). "Road World Championships: Annemiek van Vleuten wins first women's world road title". BBC Sport. BBC. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  27. ^ Fotheringham, William (28 September 2019). "Annemiek van Vleuten goes solo to seal stunning women's road race world title". TheGuardian.com. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 29 September 2019.
  28. ^ Fotheringham, William (25 September 2019). "Rohan Dennis dominates men's time trial at Road World Championships". TheGuardian.com. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  29. ^ MacLeary, John (24 September 2019). "Chloe Dygert-Owen rains on Dutch parade with momentous Road World Championships time trial victory". The Daily Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  30. ^ "Netherlands open the world championships with victory in the mixed relay". VeloNews. Pocket Outdoor Media. 22 September 2019. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  31. ^ "Road World Championships: Tom Pidcock takes under-23 bronze after initial winner disqualified". BBC Sport. BBC. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 30 September 2019.
  32. ^ Ryan, Barry. "Bjerg wins U23 time trial world title". Cyclingnews.com. Immediate Media Company. Retrieved 1 October 2019.
  33. ^ "Simmons wins men's junior road title". BBC Sport. 26 September 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  34. ^ "USA's Megan Jastrab takes junior gold in sprint finish". BBC Sport. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  35. ^ "VIDEO - UCI World Championships: The moment tearful Antonio Tiberi became junior time trial world champion". Eurosport. Discovery, Inc. 23 September 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  36. ^ "'Oops, she went the wrong way!' Russia's Gareeva wins time trial despite going off course". BBC Sport. 23 September 2019. Retrieved 2 October 2019.
  37. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Women Elite Road Race" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 28 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  38. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Women Elite Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 24 September 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  39. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Under 23 Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 24 September 2019. Retrieved 24 September 2019.
  40. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Junior Road Race" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 26 September 2019. Retrieved 26 September 2019.
  41. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Men Junior Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 23 September 2019. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  42. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Women Junior Road Race" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 28 September 2019.
  43. ^ "Final Results / Résultat final: Women Junior Individual Time Trial" (PDF). Tissot Timing. Tissot. 23 September 2019. Retrieved 23 September 2019.
  44. ^ Fotheringham, William (12 October 2016). "Yorkshire named as host of cycling's 2019 Road World Championships". TheGuardian.com. Guardian Media Group. Retrieved 15 July 2017.

External linksEdit