The 2017 Berlin ePrix (formally the 2017 FIA Formula E Berlin ePrix) were a pair of Formula E electric car races held on 10 and 11 June 2017 at the Tempelhof Airport Street Circuit in Berlin before a two-day crowd of 24,000 people. They were the seventh and eighth rounds of the 2016–17 Formula E season and the third running of the event. The 44-lap race contested on 10 June was won by Mahindra driver Felix Rosenqvist after starting from second place. Lucas di Grassi finished second for Audi Sport ABT and Rosenqvist's teammate Nick Heidfeld came in third. The longer 46-lap event on 11 June was won by e.Dams-Renault driver Sébastien Buemi who started from second position. Rosenqvist took second and di Grassi was third.

2017 Berlin ePrix
Race 7 of 12 of the 2016–17 Formula E season
Berlin Layout 2017.png
Race details
Date 10 June 2017
Official name 2017 FIA Formula E Berlin ePrix
Location Tempelhof Airport Street Circuit, Berlin, Germany
Course Street circuit
Course length 2.277 km (1.414 mi)
Distance 44 laps, 100.199 km (62.261 mi)
Weather Sunny; Air: 23.25 to 23.8 °C (73.85 to 74.84 °F), Track: 31 to 33.9 °C (87.8 to 93.0 °F)
Pole position
Driver Audi Sport ABT
Time 1:08.312
Fastest lap
Driver New Zealand Mitch Evans Jaguar
Time 1:10.224 on lap 17
Podium
First Mahindra
Second Audi Sport ABT
Third Mahindra
2017 Berlin ePrix
Race 8 of 12 of the 2016–17 Formula E season
Berlin Layout 2017.png
Race details
Date 11 June 2017
Official name 2017 FIA Formula E Berlin ePrix
Location Tempelhof Airport Street Circuit, Berlin, Germany
Course Street circuit
Course length 2.277 km (1.41 mi)
Distance 46 laps, 104.699 km (65.057 mi)
Weather Sunny: Air; 28.2 to 29.25 °C (82.76 to 84.65 °F), Track; 31.6 to 33.35 °C (88.88 to 92.03 °F)
Pole position
Driver Mahindra
Time 1:08.208
Fastest lap
Driver Germany Maro Engel Venturi
Time 1:09.519 on lap 7
Podium
First e.Dams-Renault
Second Mahindra
Third Audi Sport ABT

Di Grassi won the pole position for the first race by recording the fastest lap in qualifying and maintained his startline advantage on the first lap. Di Grassi gradually built an advantage over Rosenqvist in the opening five laps but the latter steadily reduced di Grassi's lead over the following laps to three-tenths of a second by the pit stop phase. Rosenqvist passed di Grassi for the lead on the 22nd lap and held it after switching into his second car. Rosenqvist opened up a two-second advantage over di Grassi who was struggling with battery temperature problems and maintained it for the rest of the race to secure his maiden Formula E victory. There was one lead change among two different drivers during the course of the first race.

Rosenqvist secured the pole position for the second race and he built up a large lead over Buemi on the first lap and it remained steady over the following 22 laps despite being required to manage his electrical energy consumption. Despite narrowly avoiding contact with teammate Heidfeld after being released from his garage, Rosenqvist kept the lead following the mandatory switch to a second car. Rosenqvist was immediately investigated by the stewards who issued him with a ten-second time penalty. Rosenqvist finished first on the road but his time penalty handed Buemi his sixth victory of the season and the 12th of his career. There were no lead changes as Rosenqvist led every lap from start to finish.

The results of the races meant Buemi's Drivers' Championship advantage over di Grassi had been reduced to 32 points. Rosenqvist's strong performances in both events enabled him to move from sixth to third while Prost fell to fourth. Heidfeld dropped one position to fifth. e.Dams-Renault maintained their Teams' Championship lead on 229 points but their advantage over Audi Sport ABT had been narrowed to 58 points. Mahindra's strong results enabled them to consolidate third position with 147 points with four races remaining in the season.

Contents

Background to race weekendEdit

PreviewEdit

The Berlin ePrix was confirmed as part of Formula E's 2016-17 series schedule in September 2016 by the FIA World Motor Sport Council.[1] They were the seventh and eighth of twelve scheduled single-seater electric car races of the 2016-17 season, the third running of the event, the first of three double headers, and took place at the Tempelhof Airport Street Circuit in Berlin on 10 and 11 June 2017.[2] The ePrix was confirmed as a double header in March 2017 following the cancellation of a planned race in Brussels because race organisers were unable to locate a suitable venue to hold the event, and the Berlin ePrix was announced as moving away from the Karl-Marx-Allee Circuit in the city's downtown district, and back to Tempelhof, the location of the first German race in 2015.[2] Other locations, such as the Kazak capital of Astana were considered, but the late switch made arrangements difficult.[3]

Before the races, e.Dams-Renault driver Sébastien Buemi led the Drivers' Championship with 132 points, forty-three ahead of nearest rival Lucas di Grassi in second and a further thirty-one in front of third-placed Nico Prost. Nick Heidfeld was fourth on 47 points and Jean-Éric Vergne stood in fifth place with 40 points.[4] e.Dams-Renault led the Teams' Championship with 190 points; Audi Sport ABT were in second place on 115 points and Mahindra were twenty-eight points behind in third position. Virgin were in fourth on 63 points and NextEV were fifteen points behind in the battle for the position.[4] e.Dams-Renault and Buemi had dominated the championship with di Grassi winning the Mexico City ePrix. Di Grassi, Bird, Vergne (all twice) and José María López had all finished in second place and Mahindra teammates Heidfeld (three times) and Felix Rosenqvist along with di Grassi and Bird had all achieved at least one third-place result.[4]

After strong results in the preceding two rounds of the season, Rosenqvist spoke of his aspiration to achieve more podium finish results with Mahindra, and at this late stage of the season, was focusing more on the championship, and no longer felt like a first year driver: "You have to try and take fewer risks to secure a strong result – especially with the double-headers. We have some great things coming from the team on the technical side, which is improving and both Nick and I are in the mix with those at the front of the grid."[5] Buemi entered the race with the same perspective than he did in the past two ePrix but was aware the track's layout was made of concrete rather than the conventional asphalt used in preceding races but was ready to challenge for a points-scoring position.[6] Di Grassi—nursing an ankle injury he sustained while playing in a charity football match at Stamford Bridge four days prior to the first race—[7] stated that his team had the potential to draw closer to e.Dams-Renault in the championship contest in the event his team achieved "a perfect weekend".[8]

 
Stéphane Sarrazin switched to Techeetah following Esteban Gutiérrez's move into the IndyCar Series.

The Templehof circuit underwent changes following the previous race at the track. The layout, revealed on 27 March, was announced as being contested in an anti-clockwise direction with the track made shorter and simplified to complement the faster, more efficient cars with the long main and back straights protruding out from the rest of the circuit.[9] The drivers were positive over the changes with Jérôme d'Ambrosio stating his like of "a technical circuit" and it showed that the series did not have to completely contest their races on the streets of the host city. Buemi reiterated the statement, feeling there were places on the track where overtaking would occur: "The team have done a great job learning from season 1, and taking the lessons we learned then and making a track that is better for racing cars."[10] Construction of the track started on 29 May, thirteen days before the first race.[11]

There were two driver changes heading into the ePrix. Having been with Venturi since the start of the championship, Stéphane Sarrazin was granted permission to leave the team and moved to Techeetah to replace Esteban Gutiérrez who focused on deputising for the injured Dale Coyne Racing driver Sébastien Bourdais in the IndyCar Series.[12] Sarrazin's former seat at Venturi was taken over by the team's reserve driver and reigning Formula V8 3.5 Series champion Tom Dillmann for the remainder of the season.[a][13] The switch was described by Gildo Pastor, the team principal of Venturi, as "a positive solution for all those involved": "With his experience, Stephane will be embraced by Techeetah and at the same time, the season will offer Tom the chance of gathering further important experience with Venturi."[12]

Format of the racesEdit

Two practice sessions—both on Saturday and Sunday morning—were held before the respective day's late afternoon race. The first session ran for 45 minutes and the second for 30 minutes.[14] Both the afternoon's qualifying sessions ran for 60 minutes and were divided into four groups of five cars. Each group was determined by a lottery system and was permitted six minutes of on-track activity. All drivers were limited to two timed laps with one at maximum power. The fastest five overall competitors in the four groups participated in a "Super Pole" session with one driver on the track at any time going out in reverse order from fifth to first. Each of the five drivers was limited to one timed lap and the starting order was determined by the competitor's fastest times (Super Pole from first to fifth, and group qualifying from sixth to twentieth). The driver and team who recorded the fastest time were awarded three points towards their respective championships.[14] A special feature of Formula E is the "Fan Boost" feature, an additional 100 kilowatts (130 hp) of power to use in the driver's second car. The three drivers who were allowed to use the boost were determined by a fan vote.[14]

Race oneEdit

Practice and qualifyingEdit

 
Nelson Piquet Jr. damaged his car in a crash at turn four in the first practice session.

Both practice sessions took place in warm weather conditions.[15] In the first practice session, Buemi used the maximum of 200 kilowatts (270 hp) available to him and recorded the fastest lap with a time of one minute and 8.151 seconds, almost six-tenths of a second faster than teammate Prost in second and Rosenqvist third. After leading the field for most of the session, López was fourth-fastest, ahead of Bird and Vergne. Mitch Evans, Heidfeld, di Grassi and Adam Carroll rounded out the session's top ten drivers.[16] Daniel Abt stopped at the turn three exit, and later understeered into the turn-one run-off area, but was able to continue driving.[17] Nelson Piquet Jr. oversteered into the turn four barrier. damaging his car's left-front corner. The session was later halted when Evans was stranded on the inside of turn nine and was extracted from the track after he could not resume driving.[16] Dillmann's first car had gearbox problems and was required to wait for his second car to be ready before venturing out onto the circuit.[18] Heidfeld was the fastest driver in the second practice session with a time of one minute and 8.070 seconds; his teammate Rosenqvist was second, ahead of Maro Engel in third. Di Grassi was fourth-fastest; Sarrazin was fifth and López sixth. Bird was seventh-fastest, Vergne eighth, Buemi ninth and Oliver Turvey completed the top ten ahead of first qualifying.[19]

In the first group of five qualifiers, where drivers waited for the optimum time to set their lap times, Bird paced the session despite having an oversteer in his car, ahead of Abt and Robin Frijns. Carroll was fourth and António Félix da Costa was off the pace and was the first group's slowest qualifier. Vergne drove cleanly and was the fastest driver in the second group. He was ahead of Prost who lost time in the first sector and d'Ambrosio. Engel and Loïc Duval rounded out the top five.[20] In the third group, Rosenqvist set the overall fastest lap time of any competitor in the group stages at one minute and 8.171 seconds. López was second-fastest, nearly two-tenths of a second in arrears with di Grassi third.[15] Both Piquet and Evans were off the pace and were the third group's slowest two drivers; the latter made minor contact with the barrier on his maximum power lap.[20] In the fourth group, Heidfeld was the fastest driver, nearly-three tenths of a second in front of Turvey, who was in turn, two-tenths ahead of Sarrazin.[15] Buemi was the first driver to venture onto the track in group four but struggled on his maximum power lap with a large amount of oversteer, and Dillmann rounded out the top five qualifiers.[20][21] At the end of group qualifying, the lap times set by Rosenqvist, Bird, Heidfeld, López and di Grassi were fast enough to enable their progression into super pole.[20] Di Grassi clinched the second pole position of his career with a time of one minute and 8.312 seconds. He was joined on the grid's front row by López who recorded a lap time 0.001 seconds slower than di Grassi.[22] The margin of gap was the closest in Formula E history.[23] Rosenqvist clipped the turn nine kerb, causing him to lose momentum, and slid lightly through turn ten, restricting him to third. Heidfeld qualified fourth,[21] and Bird struggled for pace, going one second slower than di Grassi in the first sector, to round out the top five.[20] Behind him, the rest of the grid order was Vergne, Turvey, Abt, Prost, d'Ambrosio, Engel, Sarrazin, Piquet, Buemi, Dillmann, Evans, Frijns, Carroll, Duval and Félix da Costa.[15]

RaceEdit

 
The start of the first race

The first race began at 16:00 Central European Summer Time (UTC+02:00).[24] Weather conditions at the start of the event were dry and sunny with an air temperature between 23.25 to 23.8 °C (73.85 to 74.84 °F) and a track temperature ranging from 31 to 33.9 °C (87.8 to 93.0 °F).[15] When the race started, di Grassi maintained his pole position advantage to lead the field entering the first corner.[25] Mahindra teammates Rosenqvist and Heidfeld made fast getaways and moved ahead of the slow starting López for second and third respectively. Abt passed Vergne for sixth and Sarrazin passed Piquet to move into 12th.[26] Evans made a good start and gained positions through the first corner, but after the field bunched up in turns two and three, he was unsighted by Sarrazin who squeezed the Jaguar into the concrete barrier lining the circuit, braking its suspension and damaging both rims.[27] Buemi did not gain any positions at the start and appeared to make contact with Piquet's car with a section of the NextEV's bodywork lodged in his vehicle's open slot.[28] At the end of the first lap, di Grassi led from Rosenqvist, Heidfeld, López, Bird, Abt, Vergne, Engel, Prost, Turvey, d'Ambrosio, Piquet, Sarrazin, Buemi, Carroll, Dillmann, Duval, Frijns, Félix da Costa and Evans.[15]

Evans limped his damaged Jaguar back to the pit lane where he switched to his second car and his team refocused their efforts to setting the race's fastest lap.[27] By the fifth lap, di Grassi held a 1.2 second advantage over Rosenqvist while Heidfeld continued to run in third, ahead of López and Bird in the two Virgin cars. Buemi gained one position by passing Sarrazin for 12th place at turn nine. Shortly afterwards, Buemi, di Grassi and Abt were announced as the winners of the first FanBoost vote.[28] Dillmann was handed a drive-through penalty for an overuse of electrical energy.[26] Rosenqvist required additional battery life to go a lap longer than di Grassi before his pit stop while Andretti teammates Félix da Costa and Frijns elected to make their stops later in an attempt to gain positions and have more electrical energy in reserve to attack in the event's closing stages.[28] Attention focused on Buemi who passed Turvey to move into the first points-scoring position of tenth and he later overtook Engel around the outside of the ninth turn for ninth place.[26] Upfront, Rosenqvist started to draw closer to di Grassi with his additional electrical energy while Heidfeld pulled away from López and Bird.[28]

 
Felix Rosenqvist took his (and Mahindra's) first victory in Formula E.

Evans recorded the race's fastest lap on lap 16, completing a circuit in one minute and 10.224 seconds, earning him one point.[29] Entering the pit stop phase, Rosenqvist reduced di Grassi's lead to three-tenths of a second after the latter locked his tyres.[26] Di Grassi lifted and coasted early, enabling Rosenqvist to pass him around the inside for the lead heading into the first corner on lap 22.[30][31] The mandatory pit stops for drivers to change into their second cars began at the conclusion of the lap when the top three drivers entered the pit lane.[15] Rosenqvist rejoined the track in the lead with di Grassi second and Heidfeld third. Abt fell behind Prost in seventh while Bird lost three positions to emerge in eighth. Félix da Costa and Frijns's strategy did not work and emerged at the rear of the field.[26] While di Grassi elected to hold back on using his FanBoost to attack Rosenqvist,[26] Buemi continued to move up the running order by passing Abt for eight and began closing up to Bird.[26][28] Despite gaining positions after the pit stops, Vergne was under investigation for being released into Dillmann's path. Meanwhile, Heidfeld started to draw closer to di Grassi with fifteen laps left.[26] Buemi out-braked Bird for seventh place around the inside of turn nine.[26][28]

Entering the closing period, Buemi had closed up to Bird and teammate Prost; the latter did not defend as Buemi took over sixth place.[28] Vergne was handed a five-second time penalty for his pit stop release and Buemi responded by allowing Vergne to pull away slightly. Rosenqvist opened up a two-second lead over di Grassi (who had battery temperature issues). The second Mahindra of Heidfeld had closed up to di Grassi who responded by using his FanBoost to defend second place.[28][30] Rosenqvist maintained the lead and crossed the start/finish line after 44 laps to secure his (and Mahindra's) first victory in Formula E.[31] Di Grassi finished second, 2.2 seconds behind,[32] with Heidfeld securing his third consecutive third-place finish.[23] López finished fourth, with Buemi fifth on the road. Prost, Abt and Bird were in the next three positions while Vergne's five-second time penalty dropped him from fifth to ninth. Engel was the last of the points-scoring finishers in tenth. Turvey, Sarrazin, Piquet, d'Ambrosio and Carroll, Duval, Félix da Costa and Frijns were the final classified drivers.[15] There was one lead change in the race; two drivers reached the front of the field. Rosenqvist led once for a total of 23 laps, more than any other driver.[32]

Post-raceEdit

 
The top three finishers on the podium after the first race.

The top three drivers appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in a later press conference. Rosenqvist said the result had been awaiting Mahindra for a long period of time and stated that he felt as if his team could win many races over the course of the season and the first Berlin race was an event that had "all the puzzle pieces came together."[31] He added that despite small errors, he was still able to secure the victory: "We work so hard and you can really see the suffering sometimes but when you have days like this it's all worth it."[31] Di Grassi stated that his car was not satisfactory and that his team started the day "very lost" and made car set-up alterations: "If you look at the pure pace from the morning - this was not the best race for us, so I tried to hang on as much as I could." He revealed he lost regeneration from his overheating battery at the end of his first stint which persisted in his second stint.[33] However di Grassi affirmed his team would improve his car and challenge for the victory in the following day's race.[31] Third-place finisher Heidfeld said Mahindra's achievement of strong finish was "a really outstanding result" and stated he struggled in the first car but could mount a challenge to di Grassi in his second vehicle.[23]

Mahindra team principal Dilbagh Gill eulogised his team's maiden victory, calling it "a massive breakthrough for Mahindra and Indian sport" but stated the company would not get eager for more wins but believed further successes would come: "We knew it would happen soon because we have had increased confidence with multiple podiums. For some reason when I woke up this morning I knew we would win."[34] After starting from 14th and finishing in fifth place, Buemi was disqualified after post-race scrutineering determined that all four tyres on both his cars were below the minimum mandated pressure of 1.60-bar (160 kPa) set by control tyre supplier Michelin, causing him to be in breach of Article 25.11 of the series' sporting regulations. Buemi's disqualification meant his teammate Prost, Bird, Vergne and Engel all gained one place and Turvey moved to tenth.[35] e.Dams-Renault co-owner Alain Prost admitted it was a mistake by his team but stated their task was to improve for the following day's race and enable Buemi to remain in championship contention[35] Buemi spoke of his disappointment in the outcome but said he would remain focused and return stronger in the second race.[35]

The result meant Buemi remained in the lead of the Drivers' Championship with 132 points but his disqualification reduced his advantage over di Grassi to 22 points. Prost remained in third place on 68 points but was now only three points ahead of race winner Rosenqvist who moved from sixth to fourth. Heidfeld fell to fifth three points in arrears of his teammate.[4] e.Dams-Renault were still leading the Teams' Championship but Audi Sport ABT's strong finish enabled the German company to reduce the deficit to 56 points. Mahindra's strong result allowed the team to consolidate third place with 127 points. Virgin maintained fourth position and moved a further 17 points ahead of NextEV with five races left in the season.[4]

Standings after the raceEdit

  • Bold text indicates who still had a theoretical chance of becoming Champion.
  • Notes: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.

Race twoEdit

Practice and qualifyingEdit

Both practice sessions were held in warm weather conditions.[36] Buemi was the only driver to utilise the full 200 kilowatts (270 hp) available to him and recorded the fastest lap of the first practice session at one minute and 7.712 seconds (which had no major incidents apart from minor contact with the barriers lining the circuit), more than one second faster than Engel in second and López was third. Di Grassi was fourth-fastest with Rosenqvist fifth and Vergne sixth. Bird, Heidfeld, Sarrazin and Prost followed in the top ten.[37][38] López set an early benchmark lap with the maximum amount of power available to him in the second practice and remained fastest with a time of one minute and 7.670 seconds; Rosenqvist was 0.083 seconds off his pace in second and Buemi was third. Bird was fourth-fastest; Abt was fifth and Vergne placed sixth. Prost was seventh-fastest, Turvey eighth, di Grassi ninth and Engel completed the top ten ahead of qualifying.[39]

 
Sam Bird qualified fourth for the second race after losing time in the track's second sector.

Qualifying took place in warm weather conditions.[36] In the first group of five drivers, where they all elected to take time to increase tyre temperature,[40] Rosenqvist paced the session, half a second faster than second-placed Engel and Sarrazin was third. Piquet was fourth-fastest,[41] while Heidfeld was affected by a throttle sensor malfunction that prevented him from recording a maximum power lap.[42] After completing his lap, Heidfeld stopped his car on the track to rectify the problem which caused him to start at the back of the grid.[41][43] Buemi drove cleanly was the fastest driver in the second group; Abt was 0.013 seconds slower than Buemi in second and Prost third. Dillmann and Carroll (who missed the turn nine apex) were the slowest drivers of the second group.[40][41] In the third group, López recorded the fastest time, ahead of Turvey and di Grassi. Evans took fourth and Félix da Costa rounded out the top five. Despite losing time in the second sector, Bird set the fastest overall time of any competitor in the group qualifying stages in the fourth group at one minute and 7.805 seconds.[41] Vergne was second-fastest, ahead of the Dragon pairing of Duval and d'Ambrosio. Frijns was the slowest driver in the fourth group, and at the end of group qualifying, the times set by Bird, López, Vergne, Buemi and Rosenqvist were fast enough to enable progression into super pole.[40] Rosenqvist clinched the second position of his career with a time of one minute and 8.208 seconds despite contending with an oversteering car. He was joined on the grid's front row by Buemi who recorded a lap 0.098 seconds slower than Rosenqvist.[40][41] López struggled with wheelspin,[40] and lost time with oversteer entering turn six, restricting him to third.[41] Bird was close to Rosenqvist's pace in the first sector, but took fourth after drifting slightly through the seventh turn. Vergne struggled with his car's handling because of oversteer and persistent brake locking, causing him to start from fifth place.[40] The rest of the field lined up as Turvey, di Grassi, Abt, Evans, Prost, Duval, d'Ambrosio, Engel, Frijns, Dillmann, Sarrazin, Félix da Costa, Piquet, Carroll and Heidfeld.[36]

RaceEdit

Weather conditions at the start of the race were dry and sunny with an air temperature between 28.2 to 29.25 °C (82.76 to 84.65 °F) and a track temperature ranging from 31.6 to 33.35 °C (88.88 to 92.03 °F).[36] When the second race began at 16:00 local time,[24] Rosenqvist maintained his pole position advantage going into the first turn. Buemi, behind remained in second position. Both Virgin cars of López and Bird drove alongside each other entering the first corner but López fended off his teammate to keep third place.[44] Rosenqvist managed to build a healthy lead over Buemi by the time they exited the turn three chicane.[45] As the field went three abreast,[44] Engel attempted to pass Duval around the outside at turn six but was unsighted by the Dragon vehicle and the two cars collided. Sections of Engel's front suspension were bent and made an unscheduled pit stop for car repairs.[46] Heidfeld made the best start in the field, moving up five positions by the end of the first lap, while Duval lost nine places over the same distance.[36] At the end of the first lap, Rosenqvist led Buemi by two seconds,[47] who was followed in turn by López, Bird, Vergne, Turvey, di Grassi, Abt, Prost, Evans, d'Ambrosio, Félix da Costa, Frijns, Carroll, Piquet, Heidfeld, Dillmann, Sarrazin, Duval and Engel.[36]

Turvey had energy management problems and was overtaken by both Audi Sport ABT cars of di Grassi and Abt on lap four.[44][48][49] Prost closed up to Turvey and passed him for eighth place shortly afterwards. Heidfeld continued to gain positions, passing the Andretti cars of Félix da Costa and Frijns to move into twelfth place.[44] Rosenqvist was lapping four seconds faster than his teammate Heidfeld and both drivers were instructed by their engineers over the radio to lift and coast for energy preservation.[47] Heidfeld used much of his electrical energy to draw closer to d'Ambrosio.[48] Engel set the race's fastest lap on lap seven, completing a circuit in one minute and 9.519 seconds, earning him one point.[36] Soon after, Buemi, di Grassi and Abt were announced as the winners of the second FanBoost vote. Tyre rubber started to accumulate within the outer limits of the track's barriers, causing one driver to make contact with the wall.[47] By the 13th lap, Heidfeld was closing up to Evans for the first points-scoring position of tenth.[44] Upfront, Rosenqvist and Buemi had pulled away from López with the two separated by one second. López was being challenged by teammate Bird for third position but the latter had difficulty in overtaking him.[48]

 
Sébastien Buemi secured his 12th career victory after Rosenqvist was penalised ten seconds for an unsafe pit stop release.

On lap 17, Bird attempted to overtake López heading into the first turn, but the two cars made contact in the corner, causing Bird to run wide and fell to sixth after he was passed by Vergne and di Grassi and was placed under pressure by Abt.[44][50] Bird lost two further positions when Abt and Prost passed him and López fell to fourth when Vergne overtook him.[44] Di Grassi passed López entering the first corner soon after.[50] Buemi was 1.3 seconds behind race leader Rosenqvist by the 20th lap but the latter was aware of the situation and glanced at his rear-view mirrors to ensure he had large enough of an advantage to remain ahead after the pit stop phase.[47] The mandatory pit stop phase for the switch into a second car began on lap 23 when the leading drivers entered the pit lane.[51] After driving out of his team's garage in his second car,[50] Rosenqvist was released into the path of Heidfeld in the other Mahindra car, causing his teammate to swerve to the outside and nearly entered another team's pit gantry. Heidfeld came to a halt without damaging his car. Although he was briefly delayed, Rosenqvist kept the lead.[51] The stewards immediately investigated Rosenqvist for the pit stop release.[44]

Aware of the possible implications, Rosenqvist pulled away to build a steady advantage over Buemi.[47] Evans's team forgot to change the gear in his second car, delaying his exit from his garage as he required additional time to get his vehicle into the correct gear.[52] This caused him to emerge at the back of the field in 18th position. As the field became comfortable in the second half of the event, di Grassi began to challenge Vergne for third.[44] Following aggressive defensive manoeuvres which drew a verbal warning from his team,[44] Vergne narrowly avoided hitting di Grassi at the final turn.[50] Vergne was put off the racing line under braking by di Grassi who overtook him for third heading into the first corner on lap 32.[47][45] Abt activated his FanBoost to try and move ahead of Vergne on the next lap but he did not pass him. Contact prevented Abt from overtaking Vergne, but after a short period of time, passed him for fourth place.[47][49] Duval stopped on the circuit but later managed to limp his ailing car into the pit lane, prematurely ending his race.[44]

Having reviewed Rosenqvist's pit stop release,[53] the stewards issued him with a ten-second time penalty on lap 34.[49]López lined up an passing manoeuvre on Vergne and got ahead of him around the outside under braking for turn nine to move into fifth place six laps later.[44][49] Vergne became vulnerable from attack from the other Virgin car of Bird,[49] but stopped battling with him after Vergne continued to aggressively defend his position.[44] Unhindered in the closing stages of the race, Rosenqvist crossed the start/finish line after 46 laps to finish first on the road, 2.9 seconds ahead of Buemi. With the application of Rosenqvist's ten-second time penalty, Buemi inherited the victory.[54] Di Grassi was a further 3.6 seconds adrift in third with his teammate Abt in fourth. López finished fifth with Vergne sixth and Bird seventh. Prost and Turvey followed in eighth and ninth places. Heidfeld rounded out the top-ten. Félix da Costa, Piquet, d'Ambrosio, Sarrazin and Dillmann, Carroll, Evans and Frijns were the last of the classified finishers.[55] It was Buemi's sixth victory of the season and the twelfth of his career.[56] There were no lead changes as Rosenqvist was the only driver to lead every lap of the race.[55]

Post-raceEdit

 
The top three finishers on the podium after the second race

The top three drivers appeared on the podium to collect their trophies and spoke to the media in a later press conference. On the way back to pit lane, Buemi declared his satisfaction over his success to commentator Dario Franchitti but he admitted the victory was handed to him "on a plate".[51] He later stated he felt Rosenqvist was the deserving victor but was happy with the pace of his car: "I think we were more or less the same pace [as Rosenqvist]. I’m very happy with that result, it just tastes a little bit different than normal."[53] Rosenqvist spoke of his belief in the short-term he would look back at the weekend positively for himself and Mahindra but was "disappointed" about his second-place result: "Today, we were under pressure from Sébastien, we knew that we would be close as they looked very strong compared to yesterday. I knew that I had to drive a perfect race, every corner we had to drive perfect. I think we did a great job."[53] Third-place finisher di Grassi praised the track and the track's organisation but acknowledged his team did not have the pace to stay with both Mahindra cars. Nevertheless, he spoke of his enjoyment with his battle against Vergne and claimed his car was quicker in the second race: "Yesterday we found some pace, which meant we could keep up a little bit with these guys, but we need to improve. There is still a couple of tenths we need to find to be able to fight [for the win]."[53]

Rosenqvist was confused over the ten-second time penalty for his pit stop release, which had him narrowly avoid hitting his teammate Heidfeld, saying he realised his teammate was entering the pit lane and applied his brakes to enable an overtake: "I feel like I was always behind and it was not really my fault. That's why I'm a bit confused why I got the penalty."[57] Mahindra was also fined €1,500 for unsafely releasing Heidfeld from his garage and into the path of Piquet.[57] Dilbagh Gill described Heidfeld's rise up the field to finish tenth as a "master class in wheel-to-wheel racing" and said his team would look forward to preparing for the season's remaining races.[58] Heidfeld called the result "bittersweet" as he stated his strong form meant had his sensor problem emerged in qualifying he could have finished in a higher position.[59] Rosenqvist said with his team's strong pace in the two Berlin races, he believed he could further extend his advantage over Prost in the Drivers' Championship: "It was a very long and tough weekend! We kept our heads together and had a near-perfect run. We had a really, really solid car. We are the ones to watch at the moment - it’s a bit of a game changer!"[60]

The result meant Buemi remained the Drivers' Championship leader on 157 points, increasing his advantage over di Grassi to 32 points. Rosenqvist's second-place finish advanced him into the third position with 86 points. Prost fell to fourth place on 72 points and was nine points ahead of fifth-placed Heidfeld.[4] e.Dams-Renault increased their Teams' Championship advantage to 58 points ahead of Audi Sport ABT. Mahindra consolidated third on 149 points. Virgin remained in fourth position with 97 points and Vergne's sixth-place finish enabled Techeetah to pass NextEV for fifth place with four races left in the season.[4] 24,000 people attended the race weekend.[53] Despite his lead, Buemi lamented that he could have left Berlin with the same advantage he held entering the weekend and sought an arrangement with his team that would allow him to participate in the New York City ePrix which clashed with another racing event that he was due to attend.[61]

Standings after the raceEdit

  • Bold text indicates who still had a theoretical chance of becoming Champion.
  • Notes: Only the top five positions are included for both sets of standings.

ClassificationEdit

Qualifying oneEdit

Pos. No. Driver Team Time Gap Grid
1 11   Lucas di Grassi Audi Sport ABT 1:08.312 1
2 37   José María López Virgin-Citröen 1:08.313 +0.001 2
3 19   Felix Rosenqvist Mahindra 1:03.395 +0.083 3
4 23   Nick Heidfeld Mahindra 1:08.650 +0.338 4
5 2   Sam Bird Virgin-Citröen 1:09.724 +1.412 5
6 25   Jean-Éric Vergne Techeetah-Renault 1:08.457 6
7 88   Oliver Turvey NextEV NIO 1:08.607 +0.150 7
8 66   Daniel Abt Audi Sport ABT 1:08.620 +0.163 8
9 8   Nico Prost e.Dams-Renault 1:08.692 +0.235 9
10 7   Jérôme d'Ambrosio Dragon-Penske 1:08.825 +0.378 10
11 5   Maro Engel Venturi 1:08.846 +0.389 11
12 33   Stéphane Sarrazin Techeetah-Renault 1:08.890 +0.433 12
13 3   Nelson Piquet Jr. NextEV NIO 1:08.961 +0.504 13
14 9   Sébastien Buemi e.Dams-Renault 1:09.010 +0.553 14
15 4   Tom Dillmann Venturi 1:09.214 +0.757 15
16 20   Mitch Evans Jaguar 1:09.219 +0.762 16
17 27   Robin Frijns Andretti-BMW 1:09.630 +1.183 17
18 47   Adam Carroll Jaguar 1:09.898 +1.441 18
19 6   Loïc Duval Dragon-Penske 1:09.923 +1.476 19
20 28   António Félix da Costa Andretti-BMW 1:11.147 +2.690 20
Source:[15]

Qualifying twoEdit

Pos. No. Driver Team Time Gap Grid
1 19   Felix Rosenqvist Mahindra 1:08.208 1
2 9   Sébastien Buemi e.Dams-Renault 1:08.306 +0.098 2
3 37   José María López Virgin-Citröen 1:08.454 +0.246 3
4 2   Sam Bird Virgin-Citröen 1:08.688 +0.480 4
5 25   Jean-Éric Vergne Techeetah-Renault 1:09.103 +0.895 5
6 88   Oliver Turvey NextEV NIO 1:08.142 6
7 11   Lucas di Grassi Audi Sport ABT 1:08.223 +0.081 7
8 66   Daniel Abt Audi Sport ABT 1:08.348 +0.206 8
9 20   Mitch Evans Jaguar 1:08.356 +0.214 9
10 8   Nico Prost e.Dams-Renault 1:08.465 +0.321 10
11 6   Loïc Duval Dragon-Penske 1:08.483 +0.339 11
12 7   Jérôme d'Ambrosio Dragon-Penske 1:08.552 +0.410 12
13 5   Maro Engel Venturi 1:08.582 +0.440 13
14 27   Robin Frijns Andretti-BMW 1:08.583 +0.441 14
15 4   Tom Dillmann Venturi 1:08.738 +0.596 15
16 33   Stéphane Sarrazin Techeetah-Renault 1:08.822 +0.680 16
17 28   António Félix da Costa Andretti-BMW 1:09:085 +0.943 17
18 3   Nelson Piquet Jr. NextEV NIO 1:09.149 +1.007 18
19 47   Adam Carroll Jaguar 1:09.543 +1.401 19
20 23   Nick Heidfeld Mahindra 1:11.267 +3.125 20
Source:[36]

Race oneEdit

Pos. No. Driver Team Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 19   Felix Rosenqvist Mahindra 44 53:19.661 3 25
2 11   Lucas di Grassi Audi Sport ABT 44 +2.232 1 212
3 23   Nick Heidfeld Mahindra 44 +4.058 4 15
4 37   José María López Virgin-Citröen 44 +13.638 2 12
5 8   Nico Prost e.Dams-Renault 44 +19.068 9 10
6 66   Daniel Abt Audi Sport ABT 44 +19.799 8 8
7 2   Sam Bird Virgin-Citröen 44 +20.065 5 6
8 25   Jean-Éric Vergne Techeetah-Renault 44 +20.6893 6 4
9 5   Maro Engel Venturi 44 +39.030 11 2
10 88   Oliver Turvey NextEV NIO 44 +40.985 7 1
11 33   Stéphane Sarrazin Techeetah-Renault 44 +42.682 12
12 3   Nelson Piquet Jr. NextEV NIO 44 +42.880 13
13 7   Jérôme d'Ambrosio Dragon-Penske 44 +45.712 10
14 47   Adam Carroll Jaguar 44 +49.658 18
15 6   Loïc Duval Dragon-Penske 44 +59.010 19
16 28   António Félix da Costa Andretti-BMW 44 +60.269 20
17 27   Robin Frijns Andretti-BMW 44 +62.463 17
18 4   Tom Dillmann Venturi 44 +67.695 15
Ret 20   Mitch Evans Jaguar 16 Did not finish 16 12
DSQ 9   Sébastien Buemi e.Dams-Renault 44 Excluded4 14
Source:[32]
Notes:
  • ^1  — Three points for pole position.[14]
  • ^2  — One point for fastest lap.[14]
  • ^3  — Jean-Éric Vergne had five seconds added to his race time for an unsafe pit stop release.[30]
  • ^4  — Sébastien Buemi was disqualified because all four tyres on both his cars were under the minimum mandated pressure.[35]

Race twoEdit

Pos. No. Driver Team Laps Time/Retired Grid Points
1 9   Sébastien Buemi e.Dams-Renault 46 56:02.155 2 25
2 19   Felix Rosenqvist Mahindra 46 +7.195 1 2156
3 11   Lucas di Grassi Audi Sport ABT 46 +10.862 7 15
4 66   Daniel Abt Audi Sport ABT 46 +13.631 8 12
5 37   José María López Virgin-Citröen 46 +20.324 3 10
6 25   Jean-Éric Vergne Techeetah-Renault 46 +20.751 5 8
7 2   Sam Bird Virgin-Citröen 46 +21.959 4 6
8 8   Nico Prost e.Dams-Renault 46 +22.155 10 4
9 88   Oliver Turvey NextEV NIO 46 +34.949 6 2
10 23   Nick Heidfeld Mahindra 46 +35.814 20 1
11 28   António Félix da Costa Andretti-BMW 46 +44.057 17
12 3   Nelson Piquet Jr. NextEV NIO 46 +44.439 18
13 7   Jérôme d'Ambrosio Dragon-Penske 46 +47.336 12
14 33   Stéphane Sarrazin Techeetah-Renault 46 +51.653 16
15 4   Tom Dillmann Venturi 46 +56.977 15
16 47   Adam Carroll Jaguar 46 +65.426 19
17 20   Mitch Evans Jaguar 46 +67.018 9
18 27   Robin Frijns Andretti-BMW 46 +72.083 14
Ret 6   Loïc Duval Dragon-Penske 33 Did not finish 11
Ret 5   Maro Engel Venturi 14 Did not finish 13 17
Source:[55]
Notes:
  • ^5  — Felix Rosenqvist had ten seconds added to his race time for an unsafe pit stop release.[53]
  • ^6  — Three points for pole position.[14]
  • ^7  — One point for fastest lap.[14]

Notes and referencesEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Dillmann filled in for the absent Maro Engel in Paris where he finished eighth.[12][13]

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External linksEdit

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2017 Paris ePrix
FIA Formula E Championship
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2017 New York City ePrix
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2016 Berlin ePrix
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2018 Berlin ePrix