1993 Major League Baseball season

The 1993 Major League Baseball season was the final season of two-division play in each league, before the Central Division was added the following season, giving both the NL and AL three divisions each.

1993 MLB season
LeagueMajor League Baseball
SportBaseball
DurationApril 5 – October 23, 1993
Number of games162
Number of teams28
Draft
Top draft pickAlex Rodriguez
Picked bySeattle Mariners
Regular Season
Season MVPAL: Frank Thomas (CHW)
NL: Barry Bonds (SF)
League postseason
AL championsToronto Blue Jays
  AL runners-upChicago White Sox
NL championsPhiladelphia Phillies
  NL runners-upAtlanta Braves
World Series
ChampionsToronto Blue Jays
  Runners-upPhiladelphia Phillies
World Series MVPPaul Molitor (TOR)
MLB seasons

Sixteen years after the American League expanded from 12 to 14 teams, the National League finally followed suit, with the Colorado Rockies and the Florida Marlins (now the Miami Marlins) joining the NL. It was also the first season since 1976 that both leagues had the same number of teams. The Toronto Blue Jays capped off the season by winning their second consecutive World Series title, beating the Philadelphia Phillies in six games. The World Series was clinched when, in one of the most famous moments in baseball, Joe Carter hit a three-run walk-off home run in the 9th to seal the victory at home.

Awards and honorsEdit

Baseball Writers' Association of America Awards
BBWAA Award National League American League
Rookie of the Year Mike Piazza (LA) Tim Salmon (CAL)
Cy Young Award Greg Maddux (ATL) Jack McDowell (CHW)
Manager of the Year Dusty Baker (SF) Gene Lamont (CHW)
Most Valuable Player Barry Bonds (SF) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Gold Glove Awards
Position National League American League
Pitcher Greg Maddux (ATL) Mark Langston (CAL)
Catcher Kirt Manwaring (SF) Iván Rodríguez (TEX)
First Baseman Mark Grace (CHC) Don Mattingly (NYY)
Second Baseman Robby Thompson (SF) Roberto Alomar (TOR)
Third Baseman Matt Williams (SF) Robin Ventura (CHW)
Shortstop Jay Bell (PIT) Omar Vizquel (SEA)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Kenny Lofton (CLE)
Larry Walker (MON) Devon White (TOR)
Marquis Grissom (MON) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)
Silver Slugger Awards
Pitcher/Designated Hitter Orel Hershiser (LA) Paul Molitor (TOR)
Catcher Mike Piazza (LA) Mike Stanley (NYY)
First Baseman Fred McGriff (SD, ATL) Frank Thomas (CHW)
Second Baseman Robby Thompson (SF) Carlos Baerga (CLE)
Third Baseman Matt Williams (SF) Wade Boggs (NYY)
Shortstop Jay Bell (PIT) Cal Ripken Jr. (BAL)
Outfielders Barry Bonds (SF) Albert Belle (CLE)
Lenny Dykstra (PHI) Juan González (TEX)
David Justice (ATL) Ken Griffey Jr. (SEA)

Statistical leadersEdit

Statistic American League National League
AVG John Olerud TOR .363 Andrés Galarraga COL .370
HR Juan González TEX 46 Barry Bonds SF 46
RBI Albert Belle CLE 129 Barry Bonds SF 123
Wins Jack McDowell CHW 22 John Burkett SF 22
ERA Kevin Appier KC 2.56 Greg Maddux ATL 2.36
SO Randy Johnson SEA 308 José Rijo CIN 227
SV Jeff Montgomery KC
Duane Ward TOR
45 Randy Myers CHC 53
SB Kenny Lofton CLE 70 Chuck Carr FLA 58

StandingsEdit

PostseasonEdit

BracketEdit

  League Championship Series
(ALCS, NLCS)
World Series
                 
East Toronto 4  
West Chi White Sox 2  
    AL Toronto 4
  NL Philadelphia 2
East Philadelphia 4
West Atlanta 2  

ManagersEdit

American LeagueEdit

Team Manager Comments
Baltimore Orioles Johnny Oates
Boston Red Sox Butch Hobson
California Angels Buck Rodgers
Chicago White Sox Gene Lamont Won American League West
Cleveland Indians Mike Hargrove
Detroit Tigers Sparky Anderson
Kansas City Royals Hal McRae
Milwaukee Brewers Phil Garner
Minnesota Twins Tom Kelly
New York Yankees Buck Showalter
Oakland Athletics Tony La Russa
Seattle Mariners Lou Piniella
Texas Rangers Kevin Kennedy
Toronto Blue Jays Cito Gaston Won World Series

National LeagueEdit

Team Manager Comments
Atlanta Braves Bobby Cox Won National League West
Chicago Cubs Jim Lefebvre
Cincinnati Reds Tony Pérez Replaced during the season by Davey Johnson
Colorado Rockies Don Baylor Expansion team
Florida Marlins Rene Lachemann Expansion team
Houston Astros Art Howe
Los Angeles Dodgers Tommy Lasorda
Montreal Expos Felipe Alou
New York Mets Jeff Torborg Replaced during the season by Dallas Green
Philadelphia Phillies Jim Fregosi Won the National League pennant
Pittsburgh Pirates Jim Leyland
St. Louis Cardinals Joe Torre
San Diego Padres Jim Riggleman
San Francisco Giants Dusty Baker

Home Field Attendance & PayrollEdit

Team Name Wins Home attendance Per Game Est. Payroll
Colorado Rockies[1] 67 4,483,350 55,350 $10,353,500
Toronto Blue Jays[2] 95 -1.0% 4,057,947 0.7% 50,098 $47,279,166 5.6%
Atlanta Braves[3] 104 6.1% 3,884,720 26.2% 47,960 $41,641,417 20.3%
Baltimore Orioles[4] 85 -4.5% 3,644,965 2.2% 45,000 $29,096,500 21.8%
Los Angeles Dodgers[5] 81 28.6% 3,170,393 28.2% 39,141 $39,440,999 -11.9%
Philadelphia Phillies[6] 97 38.6% 3,137,674 62.8% 38,737 $28,538,334 16.5%
Florida Marlins[7] 64 3,064,847 37,838 $19,330,545
St. Louis Cardinals[8] 87 4.8% 2,844,977 17.6% 35,123 $23,367,334 -15.3%
Chicago Cubs[9] 84 7.7% 2,653,763 24.8% 32,363 $39,386,666 32.0%
San Francisco Giants[10] 103 43.1% 2,606,354 67.0% 32,177 $35,159,000 6.0%
Chicago White Sox[11] 94 9.3% 2,581,091 -3.7% 31,865 $39,696,166 31.6%
Cincinnati Reds[12] 73 -18.9% 2,453,232 5.9% 30,287 $44,879,666 34.2%
Boston Red Sox[13] 80 9.6% 2,422,021 -1.9% 29,901 $37,120,583 -14.9%
New York Yankees[14] 88 15.8% 2,416,942 38.2% 29,839 $42,723,000 13.5%
Texas Rangers[15] 86 11.7% 2,244,616 2.1% 27,711 $36,376,959 20.7%
Cleveland Indians[16] 76 0.0% 2,177,908 77.9% 26,888 $18,561,000 98.0%
Houston Astros[17] 85 4.9% 2,084,618 72.1% 25,736 $30,210,500 96.1%
California Angels[18] 71 -1.4% 2,057,460 -0.4% 25,401 $28,588,334 -17.7%
Seattle Mariners[19] 82 28.1% 2,052,638 24.3% 25,341 $33,646,333 44.4%
Minnesota Twins[20] 71 -21.1% 2,048,673 -17.5% 25,292 $28,217,933 0.7%
Oakland Athletics[21] 68 -29.2% 2,035,025 -18.4% 25,124 $37,812,333 -7.9%
Detroit Tigers[22] 85 13.3% 1,971,421 38.4% 24,339 $38,150,165 39.6%
Kansas City Royals[23] 84 16.7% 1,934,578 3.6% 23,884 $41,455,167 22.3%
New York Mets[24] 59 -18.1% 1,873,183 5.3% 23,126 $39,043,667 -12.5%
Milwaukee Brewers[25] 69 -25.0% 1,688,080 -9.1% 20,840 $23,806,834 -23.2%
Pittsburgh Pirates[26] 75 -21.9% 1,650,593 -9.8% 20,378 $24,822,467 -26.9%
Montreal Expos[27] 94 8.0% 1,641,437 -1.7% 20,265 $18,899,333 19.4%
San Diego Padres[28] 61 -25.6% 1,375,432 -20.1% 16,981 $25,511,333 -5.0%

Television coverageEdit

Network Day of week Announcers
CBS Saturday afternoons Sean McDonough, Tim McCarver, Greg Gumbel, Jim Kaat
ESPN Sunday nights
Tuesday nights
Wednesday nights
Friday nights
Jon Miller, Joe Morgan

EventsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Colorado Rockies Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  2. ^ "Toronto Blue Jays Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  3. ^ "Atlanta Braves Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  4. ^ "Baltimore Orioles Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  5. ^ "Los Angeles Dodgers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  6. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  7. ^ "Florida Marlins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  8. ^ "St. Louis Cardinals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  9. ^ "Chicago Cubs Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  10. ^ "San Francisco Giants Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  11. ^ "Chicago White Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  12. ^ "Cincinnati Reds Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  13. ^ "Boston Red Sox Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  14. ^ "New York Yankees Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  15. ^ "Texas Rangers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  16. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  17. ^ "Cleveland Indians Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  18. ^ "Los Angeles Angels Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  19. ^ "Seattle Mariners Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  20. ^ "Minnesota Twins Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  21. ^ "Oakland Athletics Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  22. ^ "Detroit Tigers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  23. ^ "Kansas City Royals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  24. ^ "New York Mets Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  25. ^ "Milwaukee Brewers Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  26. ^ "Pittsburgh Pirates Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  27. ^ "Washington Nationals Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  28. ^ "San Diego Padres Attendance, Stadiums and Park Factors". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved September 8, 2020.
  29. ^ Pellowski, Michael J (2007). The Little Giant Books of Baseball Facts. United States: Sterling Publishing Co. pp. 352. ISBN 9781402742736.
  30. ^ "George Brett - BR Bullpen". www.baseball-reference.com. Retrieved March 17, 2018.

External linksEdit